5 Practical Gifts for Female Backpackers on Their Bon Voyage

I’m writing this from the Hong Kong International Airport and marvelling at the timing of this post. What better occasion to discuss such a subject than the day I fly overseas for my O.E.? ✈

When someone is leaving on their big adventure, it can be tempting to want to get them a farewell gift as a gesture of kindness and well wishes. However, this can easily be made difficult if that said someone is backpacking. I think I speak for most everyone when I say that I struggle to fit my belongings into a suitcase let alone backpack. Right this very moment, some poor chap is lugging my oversized luggage from one plane and onto another. So the challenge therefore becomes thinking of a gift that the traveler can take wherever they go with nothing but a backpack to live out of.

Oi Cup

“The Oi Cup is the perfect companion for the female traveler. There are three ‘criteria’ that people often try to meet when traveling: pack light, spend less, and explore the off-the-beaten track. Periods are simply incompatible with these. For one, the last thing you want to be sacrificing your precious luggage space for is cumbersome boxes of sanitary products. But at the same time, you don’t want to be budgeting to spend extra money on pads and tampons (a single pad can cost up to NZD$5.60 in some countries!). Furthermore, the last thing you want is to be caught empty-handed in the middle of nowhere with no resources to deal with your period. Trust me, I’ve been there… your underwear won’t thank you 🙈”

If you’re a long-term reader of the Ginger Passports, then you might remember the blog post I wrote on Organic Initiative’s menstrual cups.

These little beauties are a game changer when it comes to our periods. The ‘Oi Cup’ is a reusable and recyclable menstrual cup that can be used instead of tampons or pads. It’s environmentally friendly and can last up to 12 hours before needing to be changed. Let’s just say I don’t dread those long haul flights any more, and neither should your backpacker.

Couchsurfing Verification

If you don’t know what Couchsurfing is, then you’re missing out.

Couchsurfing is a website where travellers can sign up and either host, or be hosted by, people around the globe. There is no exchange of money, only of experience. As it so happens, my first Couchsurfing experience as a guest is to be tonight (updates to come!) but I have hosted before in the city of Dunedin. Two lovely German traveler stayed with me for a couple of days, and we did a variety of things together such as sharing stories, drinking wine and visiting the Butterfly Forest at the Otago Museum. It was honestly one of the highlights of the past few months, and I cannot wait to throw myself back into that environment again.

“We envision a world made better by travel and travel made richer by connection. Couchsurfers share their lives with the people they encounter, fostering cultural exchange and mutual respect.”

It’s a fantastic idea to create a verified Couchsurfing account. Verification essentially means that you go through a process (including things such as confirming your home address and paying an annual fee) which both lets other Couchsurfers know that you are a substantiated person, and also provides revenue to help keep the Couchsurfing community running.

Like anything, Couchsurfing can carry an element of risk, so here are my top tips for ensuring a safe experience:

  • Never stay with anyone who doesn’t have (positive) references
  • Go with your gut instinct; if you are messaging someone and something feels a bit dodgy, listen to that. A lot of people use Couchsurfing as they would Tinder, so take everything with a grain of salt
  • Prioritise opting for verified hosts for better piece of mind

Kindle

When you’re traveling, there will inevitably come periods of fatal boredom where you would do anything for a decent book. Whether these be those god-awful long-haul flights or just awkward transit delays, it’s never a bad thing to have Harry Potter on hand. (By the way, if you are in need of a book recommendation, I recommend you check out this publication.)

I started off with a Kindle eReader, and then eased into accessing the Kindle Cloud Reader from my smart phone. This might be the most desirable option for your backpacker if she is seriously tight for space.

Although I won’t deny the pleasure of turning the pages of a physical book, the Kindle eReader sure did grow on me. A minimalist at heart, I like the idea of being able to buy my own virtual library without having to waste paper for books that I would probably never ever read again. Plus, books are a sight lot cheaper when you’re not buying paperback. Food for thought 💸

Photograph courtesy of Unsplash

Audible

Whilst we’re on the subject of literature, allow me to introduce you to Audible.

Audible – also an Amazon company – allows you to listen to books instead of reading them. Yep, I’m talking good old audiobooks.

I first tried to develop an appreciation for audiobooks when I was around ten years old, and it just wasn’t happening for me. I found that I couldn’t concentrate or properly envisage what was actually happening without having it on a page right in front of me. Roughly a decade later, I tried again. This time, with considerably more success.

I like to think of audiobooks as a passive way of reading. I plug in my earphones if I’m tired or feeling nauseous and not up to reading off the page. They’re also fantastic to fall asleep to – although be careful what you listen to during those times, because you might be in for some very confusing dreams. All your backpacker will require is some sort of cellular device to download the app, and a pair of headphones. You might like to gift them with an annual subscription where they can download one free audiobook per month (my favourite day of each month, if I’m being honest).

Photograph courtesy of Unsplash

Handwritten Letters

Last but not least, I recommend you write your female backpacker a handwritten letter on her bon voyage.

A sheet of paper takes up no room at all. She could slip it into her wallet, or even beneath her phone case. Handwritten letters are special because, well, they can’t be bought. They’re meaningful and timeless and are one of the only things that can reliably cheer someone up when she is halfway around the world and feeling completely and utterly alone.

In this day and age, handwritten letters are unexpected. That’s what packs their real punch. Before I left, I received a number of cards that had some really beautiful thoughts jotted down inside of them. Some I received from people I didn’t think had even acknowledged that I was leaving, which just made them all the more significant for me.

So, there you have it: the most special gift I could think to receive is something that costs nothing and lasts forever. And at the sound of clichés, I’m signing off.

Photograph courtesy of Unsplash

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The Local’s Guide to Dunedin

For those of you who haven’t the pleasure of experiencing Dunedin, allow me to introduce you to this special place. Dunedin is a southern city in New Zealand characterised by its famous peninsula, Scottish roots and student vibe.

There’s plenty to do in Dunedin. Tripadvisor will tell you to visit Larnach CastleSpeight’s BreweryRoyal Albatross Colony and Baldwin Street – and you know what? Those things are great, and you will certainly enjoy “drinking like a southern man” and hiking up the world’s steepest street. But what you will be missing out on is the authentic local experience. Dunedin has a thriving tourism industry that is celebrated and embraced, but sometimes you’ve just got to detour the queues and venture off the beaten path to actually understand a place.

Lovers Leap

Perhaps the most famous point of interest for Dunedin is the stunning Otago Peninsula, which – fun fact – was named by CNN as one of the ten most romantic places in the world to propose.

Whilst the Otago Peninsula is synonymous with ‘tourist hot spot’, you can still navigate the gloriously wild terrain with a degree of solitude. Tourists tend to flock to places such as Sandfly Bay or the Pyramids, so more remote areas are yours for the taking. My personal favourite is Lovers Leap – and the neighbouring Chasm – that are part of the Sandymount Track Network. Check out the following excerpt from my blog post Postcards from Lovers Leap

“Those who embark on the trek will be treated to the stunningly resplendent views of Sandymount carpark before a short stroll through rolling farmland to reach the Chasm (keep an eye out for the sheep!). After soaking in the monumental (and arguably formidable) abyss, negotiate the sloping and rugged coastline towards the 225m crag of Lovers Leap.”

University of Otago Public Lectures

To say Dunedin is a student city would be an understatement. In my eyes, the defining feature of this place is the University of Otago. The 148-year-old campus boasts beautiful gothic architecture which makes it a joy to walk through the campus and actually attend class (because, y’know, us students need all the help we can get).

One of my favourite things about this university is their regular and free public lectures. Averaging around five a week, the topics are vast and fascinating, and offer an invaluable opportunity to learn something new. From the politics of the Middle East to the latest findings in medical research, from the relationship between academia and Buddhism to the refugee crisis, you’ll discover a passion in something you’d hardly ever thought about.

These lectures are often presented by world-class researchers and take place either on campus or at other venues around the city such as the Public Art Gallery or the Toitu Early Settlers Museum. I find this a rewarding past-time, especially as a student who often feels confined by a narrow degree subject which leaves little room for educational exploration.

Follow this link to find upcoming lecture events.

Starfish Café

I told myself that I would only include one eatery on this list, a task that was not made easier by the fact that Dunedin has a flourishing café culture. However, when it came down to it, there was only one that could ever take out the crown. And so – not for the first time – I present to you Starfish Café.

Starfish overlooks the beach in Saint Clair – fifteen minutes from the city centre – meaning it caters predominantly to the locals. This just makes it feel all the more homely and familiar, and I always smile when the staff recognise me and say hello. Check out the following excerpt from my blog post Starfish Café: Your Sunday Morning Fix.

“It’s hard to define Starfish, but maybe that’s the beauty of it. From the electric swing playing over the speakers to the David Bowie posters pouting down at you from the wall, from the vintage swan wallpaper to the Pacific Ocean right outside the front door… and I haven’t even gotten to the food yet. Think coconut turmeric lattes as you sit outside and enjoy the sun on a lazy Sunday morning. Think a glass of wine as you wind down to an acoustic set on a Friday evening. Think fresh seafood sourced straight from the Otago harbour. Mouth watering yet?”

Signal Hill Lookout

Now this is one city secret that I’m surprised isn’t more popular. Signal Hill is – without a shred of a doubt – the best lookout in Dunedin.

Although you’re unlikely to have it all to yourself (there’s usually small groups of people playing frisbee or eating fish and chips), you’ll be too distracted by the jaw-dropping views to notice. The lookout also hosts the city’s New Zealand Centennial Memorial, and has the ‘Big Easy’ bike trail for those questionable souls who feel like cycling 6.1km uphill.

For the best footage, watch my Dunedin vlog at the bottom of this post!

The photographs below are courtesy of  Amplifier NZ and Wikipedia (respectively).

University Book Shop

Book shops are my guilty pleasure, and none more so than the University Book Shop.

Unfortunately for my wallet, UBS is situated right next to the University of Otago, meaning that it is a daily battle for me not to enter and sacrifice the contents of my bank account. What sets UBS apart from every other book shop is that their titles extend beyond the generic bestsellers. Bibliophiles rejoice! They curate provocative publications that require good old fashioned rummaging through the shelves to find, and you could easily wile away hours inside the labyrinth of literature.

If you’re a stationery enthusiast (I mean, who isn’t?), you won’t be disappointed either; UBS sells unique gift stationery along with tea leaves, scented candles and novelty socks. UBS is also proud to be involved in Dunedin’s special UNESCO City of Literature status.

Photography courtesy of Hotel St Clair.

Be sure to also check out…

Dunedin Botanic Gardens: Through My Lens

Flight of the Butterflies: Otago Museum’s Tropical Forest

Brew-tiful: Nectar Espresso Bar & Café

The Beach Review #1: Saint Kilda

As well as my Dunedin Travel Vlog 👇

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The Pocket Guide to Kiwi Slang

“She’ll be right!”

It’ll all work out.

“Nah mate, don’t you worry… she’ll be right.”

Chur

An alternative to saying ‘thanks’ or ‘cheers’.

“Chur bro!”

“Yeah… nah.”

Another expression for ‘no’. Because us Kiwi’s like to be unnecessarily confusing sometimes.

“Oh, um, yeah… nah.”

Chocka

When something is full. Can refer to objects or your stomach.

“Blimey, I’m feeling chocka!”

Bro

Short for ‘brother’ but used (excessively) as a relatively gender-neutral term of endearment for close friends.

“Hey bro, good to see you!”

Stoked

A word that describes feeling really, really chuffed about something.

“I’m super stoked with this weather.”

Cuppa

Referring to a cup of tea of coffee.

“It’s been a long day. Time for a cuppa.”

Munted

When something is essentially f*cked.

“The car? Yeah, it’s pretty munted.”

Tiki Tour

Taking the long route to get somewhere; often used to pretend one is not lost.

“Where are we?!”

“… we’re going on a tiki tour.”

Congratulations! You just navigated the wild and treacherous landscape of Kiwi slang… now you’ve just got to understand that damn accent.

All photos courtesy of Unsplash.

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6 Things I’ve Learned in 6 Months as a Travel Blogger

It’s hard to believe that it was a whole six months ago that I launched the Ginger Passports. I feel as though it was just the other week that I was frustratingly trying to work out what hosting platforms and domain names were (*cue traumatic technological flashbacks*). Fortunately, the good times have far outweighed the bad, and I’m still here going strong 💪

To celebrate 182 days (give or take) as a travel blogger, I’ve rounded up the six most significant things I have learned along the way. Whether you use these as inspiration for starting your own blogging enterprise, or you’re simply curious, I hope everyone can take something away from this post!

I remember how when I was conducting my own research into personal experiences of blogging before I decided to take the big leap, a recurring theme connecting all bloggers was their insistence on being driven by passion rather than forces such as money. I would roll my eyes, both at the cheesiness and seeming impracticality of that advice.

Well, it just so turns out that the joke is on me, because the only thing you can rely on in this endeavour is your own enthusiasm. When you enter the blogging sphere, it’s easy to be blinded by the potential for making revenue and enjoying free perks such as sponsored products. Whilst I have certainly reaped the benefits of the latter, I would be lying through my teeth if I said that those perks make everything worth it. I have invested hours upon hours into this blog, and at the end of the day, I have relatively little to show in terms of earnings. Well… little. Well… none. But the point is, I have also loved every single minute of it, and that knowledge in itself is enough to drive me forwards.

To quote the Beatles, “I get by with a little help from my friends”.

I may be confident creating content, but I am certainly no expert when it comes to technology. Truth be told, the reason it took me so long to actually get a blog up and running was because I couldn’t navigate the technicalities. Hosting platform? Domain name? Bitch please, I struggle to operate my TV remote.

Fortunately for me, I was approached by a good friend who studies IT, and was offered his services. We have been working together for most of 2017, and the Ginger Passports has certainly benefited from it. Without him, I would probably still be on wordpress.com with a website looking as though it were designed by a fourth grader.

Long story short, what I’m trying to communicate here is that sometimes you just need to put your pride to one side and ask for help (or accept it, in my case). Furthermore, there’s something undeniably rewarding about being part of a team. It can get awfully lonely otherwise.

When I was first developing this blog, I – being as stubborn as I am – was hell-bent that I would publish a new post three times a week regardless of circumstances. Oh, if only.

Tying back into the first point about passion, sticking to a schedule in a context such as this relies largely on motivation. If you wake up on Sunday morning, realise that you have only published two posts in the past seven days, but cannot for the life of you find a couple of hours to draft something up between all of your other commitments, then guess what? You’re not the massive failure you think you are.

I have the luxury of not being held accountable by anyone for missing my weekly goal of three posts – save perhaps myself, who is a pretty merciless judge. Unrealistic expectations aside, this luxury means I have the flexibility to roll with the punches and write when the mood takes me. Generally, my passion for blogging squeezes out at least two posts a week, but that’s not always the case. And you know what? That’s okay. If I sacrificed the joy of flexible blogging to meet my tri-weekly goal right from the outset, I would not be here six months later writing this post.

I’m talking about the two C’s here: content and collaborations.

Regarding content, there have been some subject matters I have written about that I was scared would backfire and earn a negative reception. Likewise, there were some that dealt with issues I don’t have a knowledge base in, and wasn’t entirely confident writing about. Nevertheless, I gritted my teeth and clicked ‘publish’. I figured that I have to start somewhere, and I can’t just discuss travel playlists and Balinese villas named after Ariana Grande for the rest of my blogging career.

Collaborating was also an intimidating prospect for me. Infact, it wasn’t until a couple of months ago that I finally mustered the courage to start emailing brands and bloggers about the possibility of working together. Now, I’m not trying to deceive you; I estimate that approximately 90% of those that I reach out to either ignore or politely decline my offers. But the key point worthy of highlighting here is that 10% accepted. There are plenty of exciting projects in the works thanks to those 10%; you might have already read about my campaign with Organic Initiative. Not unlike creating content that exceeded my comfort zone, I took risks and they paid off.

I welcome any excuse to channel my inner Monica Gellar.

Perhaps the most important resource I use to keep my blog developing is planning. The easiest way to lose track of your goals is not to have any, but setting those goals is only half the job. The other half entails actually working out how to achieve them.

As I have mentioned numerous times over the course of this post, my goal is to publish (roughly) three posts per week. I manage to reach that goal most of the time (*cough*) by planning in advance. On the last day of each month, I set aside time to brainstorm which posts I will write, and on what days I shall publish them. On a similar note, I also track my blog statistics on this same day for the past month, compare these figures with other months, analyse what were the strengths and weaknesses and decide how I can capitalise on these in future.

Planning is not only productive, but thoroughly gratifying as well. There’s nothing like ticking off the tasks on your to do list one by one, and the sense of accomplishment you gain is yet another of those driving forces behind your motivation.

I know, I know… that sounds absolutely bonkers. That’s like saying ‘you don’t have to wear make up to be a make up blogger’.

But it’s true! The beauty of travel blogging is that a majority of your readership are not going to be from where you live. I call New Zealand home, and have received so many lovely messages from readers across the globe asking about this beautiful country. I have written so many posts about Dunedin without having to travel more than ten minutes from my front door. By viewing the city through the lens of an outsider, I have actually felt like a tourist. It was something I didn’t think I would ever have the opportunity to experience.

I have also enjoyed writing about things that extend beyond geographical location. Some of my favourite posts include 5 Travel Tattoos That Don’t Scream PINTEREST and the No-Bullsh*t Guide to Saving Money to Travel for Young Adults, both of which did not require me to buy a plane ticket or even sacrifice the warmth and comfort of my bed.

I have gone six months without traveling (save for a sneaky wee trip three hours west to Central Otago) and still have ideas up my sleeve for future blog posts. Travel blogging has taught me to find inspiration in everything, and that is certainly something I don’t take for granted.

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Dunedin Botanic Gardens: Through My Lens

The ‘Deats:

Name: Dunedin Botanic Gardens

Website: www.dunedinbotanicgarden.co.nz

Location: 12 Opoho Road, North Dunedin, New Zealand

Open Hours: Dawn to Dusk

Cost: Free! 💵

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Oi Ladies, Listen Up – It’s a Bloody Revolution! (feat. GIVEAWAY)

Let’s talk periods.

That’s right… periods. Some of us are blessed with a slight monthly inconvenience; others burdened with the living incarnation of a raised middle finger. Whatever your time of the month looks like, it’s something that most of us girls have to deal with. And because of that, it’s something we should be talking about.

When I was preparing for my first independent overseas trip, I was conscious of a lot of things that I needed to pre-organise. Amongst those included applying for visas, purchasing emergency meds and putting together a first aid kit. What completely slipped my mind was the fact that I was due to get my period overseas, and would need plenty of products on hand to manage the flow. This left me with graphic memories of sprinting into a rural Vietnamese pharmacy in the middle of the night and trying to mime to the lady behind the counter – who did not speak a word of English – that I desperately needed a pack of tampons (*face-palm*). Not one of my finer moments, I will admit; but it does illustrate the glamorous reality of being a menstruating woman.

Upon returning to New Zealand, I was determined to find a solution to my forgetfulness. The fact that I rarely carry around spare pads or tampons is only exacerbated by my period refusing to commit to any sort of regular routine. That + the price of sanitary products = 👎

Enter: Oi.

Oi – Organic Initiative – is an ethical New Zealand company that sells feminine hygiene products. They have recently released the Oi Cup, a reusable and recyclable menstrual cup that functions as a natural alternative to tampons and pads. The Oi Cup sits internally in your vagina and gathers your flow for up to a whopping 12 hours. It almost sounds too good to be true – but fortunately, it isn’t.

Switching to the Oi Cup completely transformed my menstrual experience. Sure, it took a little experimenting the first cycle I used it, but after that? I’ve never looked back.

If you’re anything like me and run laps to and from the bathroom when that time of the month strikes, you might be relieved to learn that menstrual cups hold around 5 times the amount of liquid as the average tampon. For the first time, I can sleep a full, uninterrupted night and wake up without looking like I’ve just survived a shark attack.

The Oi Cup is a game changer when it comes to the environment. Did you know that it can take centuries upon centuries for sanitary products to break down in a landfill? It’s time to face the facts: pads and tampons that are made of plastic just aren’t sustainable 🙅 Unlike those pesky products, the Oi Cup bears minimal impact upon the environment.

According to an article by the Huffington Post, women spend approximately NZD$3140 on sanitary products over the course of their lifetime. $3140?! That’s insane! Do you know what you could buy with that? A 12-day Contiki tour to Mexico. Or 7 return trips from Auckland to Bali. By contrast, the Oi Cup will cost you a mere NZD$39.95 for up to 10 years of use. That’s a jaw-dropping difference of nearly $900 every decade.

I’ll just let that sink in for a bit.

The Oi Cup is the perfect companion for the female traveler. There are three ‘criteria’ that people often try to meet when traveling: pack light, spend less, and explore the off-the-beaten track. Periods are simply incompatible with these. For one, the last thing you want to be sacrificing your precious luggage space for is cumbersome boxes of sanitary products. But at the same time, you don’t want to be budgeting to spend extra money on pads and tampons (a single pad can cost up to NZD$5.60 in some countries!). Furthermore, the last thing you want is to be caught empty-handed in the middle of nowhere with no resources to deal with your period. Trust me, I’ve been there… your underwear won’t thank you 🙈

Luckily, the Oi Cup solves all of these problems. Don’t want to have to lug boxes upon boxes of sanitary products in your suitcase? One small cup ticks that box. Don’t want to have to fork out additional costs to stock up on pads and tampons? No problem. Your period decides to make a malicious return a few days earlier than expected? Oi has you covered.

If a menstrual cup just isn’t for you, then don’t fret! Oi prides itself on providing a diversity of environmentally-friendly and socially-responsible products to tackle that time of the month. Think panty liners, pads and tampons (with and without applicators).

So… just what sets Oi’s products apart from the rest of the market?

  • 100% pure certified organic cotton
  • Hypoallergenic
  • Biodegradable
  • Free from perfume, dyes, chemicals and synthetics
  • Recommended by gynaecologists, midwives and obstetricians

The team at Oi are visionaries when it comes to the relationship between women and their bodies. They aim to empower people through educated, positive choices and the ability to stand up for what they believe in.

“Oi stands for every woman, Oi stands for health and Oi stands for our world.”

To celebrate an ethical and revolutionary approach to our periods, the Ginger Passports has teamed up with Oi to host a giveaway. By following the steps below, you will go in the draw to win an Oi Cup – worth NZD$39.95 – for free!

  1. Follow the Ginger Passports on Facebook
  2. Either comment on this post OR like this Facebook post

It’s as simple as that! This giveaway will run for two weeks, and the winner will be drawn on Tuesday 13th June. Good luck!

Let’s begin the period conversation. With Oi, we are doing our bit for the planet – and our own bodies – every month without even having to think about it. Healthy habits = healthy women. It’s a bloody revolution.

The ‘Deats

Name: Organic Initiative (Oi)

Website: www.oi4me.com

Social Media: Facebook ● Instagram ● Twitter

Disclaimer: This post is in collaboration with Oi. All opinions are my own 🙋

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Vlog: Dunedin Edition

Dunedin has a special place in my heart.

I’m going to keep this post short and sweet, and let the video do the talking. I actually got quite emotional editing this, and hope that by watching this, you too will see the beauty and identity this southern New Zealand city has to offer.

Featuring…

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Traveling with the F-Word (That’s Right…Feminism)

Let’s have a little talk, shall we?

As a gender studies student, I was determined that I would somehow incorporate a blog post discussing this wonderful thing called feminism. For those of you that are not acquainted with feminism – or perhaps need a little refreshing in the midst of the anti-feminist backlash – allow me to welcome you back into the classroom.

Feminism is essentially the advocacy of women’s rights on the ground of the equality of the sexes. And when I say ‘essentially’, what I mean is that I copied and pasted that right out of the dictionary. Plagiarism points for me.

Gender equality – or inequality, I should say – bleeds into every area of life. We hear about the gender ratio in parliament, the wage gap between female and male employees, and even the extent of legal independence women should have in some parts of the world. As important as these issues are, there is a further niche where gendered assumptions and expectations permeate, however implicitly: travel.

In the travel arena, I am a very privileged individual. Pretending otherwise will not do anyone any good. I’m privileged because I grew up in a safe country rich with opportunity (shout out to New Zealand), am from a financially stable background and have a supportive family who encourage anything and everything I set my mind to. The term ‘privilege’ receives a bad reputation because it includes connotations of individuals who have never had to work a day in their life, don’t understand what it means to be confronted with setbacks, and who are generally just ‘bad people’. I acknowledge that the avenues I have taken to make progress towards my goals may not have been characterised by the hardship many other people experience, but that doesn’t automatically make me unworthy of enjoying them. Accepting that I am in a position of privilege – as uncomfortable as that process may be – affords me the opportunity to overcome the prevailing obstacle in the way of holding myself partly accountable for the injustice in today’s society.

Travel can be a feminist pursuit through many means. Anything that furthers women’s ability to achieve things that society may not necessarily acknowledge or approve of for women is a feminist issue. This article will illustrate 3 tropes which you – as a female traveler – can identify to challenge the mentalities that prevent women from participating in an equal and rewarding experience of the world 💪

The “Settle Down” Trope

You know what I’m talking about – the idea that a woman has only succeeded at being a woman if she has managed to land a job, find a man, slap a ring on her finger and pop out two or three young ‘uns. That, ladies and gentleman, is the arithmetic of womanhood. Anything that strays from this paragon means she has failed.

One of the many problems with this trope is that it doesn’t accommodate goals such as travel. How is a woman supposed to maintain a 9-5 job when she’s never in one place long enough to make the interview? How is a woman supposed to settle down if she doesn’t have the suburban house with the white picket fence? An airport is no place to raise children.

The reality is that this paradigm does not fit every woman. Truth be told, I would be surprised if any woman – or man, for that matter – was perfectly content following this preconceived course. Success is subjective, and in the words of Swami Vivekananda: “The idea of perfect womanhood is perfect independence.”

The “Vulnerable Woman” Trope

“But is it safe? You know… for a woman?” 

“Will you have a man with you?”

“No parent wants their daughter alone in a foreign country – you’re being selfish!”

If any of these sound familiar to you, then you will have been exposed to the Vulnerable Woman Trope. This is the one where – upon announcing your travel plans – people automatically latch onto the implications of your gender.

Now, I’m not stupid. I know that there are some places in the world that it would be simply irresponsible to venture alone. But there are also a lot of places that – while they certainly carry their risks – should not be off-limits for someone purely because they identify as a woman and not a man.

Statistics illustrate how men are actually twice as likely to experience violent assault committed by strangers than women. Yet, you rarely hear people warning their fellow male friends to avoid traveling alone. This fixation on the danger of solo female traveling only disseminates the cultural falsehood not only of women as vulnerable and helpless beings, but also of the conceptual impossibility of men as victims of crime. These ideas work to scare women out of expanding their comfort zone, and are all but an invitation for victim-blaming if a woman does happen to be assaulted whilst traveling on her own.

The take home message is that you should not let misogynistic stereotypes around female independence limit your opportunities. No one should travel somewhere without educating themselves on personal protection and welfare, and consulting the social and political landscape of any prospective country before booking those plane tickets should be a priority. Bear in mind that gendered advice around security can be delivered more for the purpose of reaffirming the Vulnerable Woman Trope rather than actually presenting a realistic view of safety. Traveling alone can be a rewarding and empowering experience – for both women and men – and we need to understand that threats to this independence are not all that meets then eye.

P.S. a fantastic resource for genuine advice on street harassment whilst traveling is this article by Everyday Feminism.

 

The “Woman = Things” Trope

When I was preparing to move overseas for the first time, I pulled a Marie Kondo and down-sized my possessions to the point where I could fit everything I owned into one suitcase. When I would share this with my friends, they would be astounded and ask how I could get rid of so much shit. And that’s what I want to emphasise – that it really was ‘shit’. It may have been shit I was admittedly attached to, but it was nevertheless shit. When it came down to it, I didn’t really need five pairs of Nikes. Nor did I really need three sets of reusable coffee flasks. Once I accepted that, a more minimalist lifestyle suddenly became a lot more appealing.

Society is obsessed with ‘things’ – and by ‘things’, I mean anything that you can buy/own. We tend to hierarchise people based on money; a habit propagated by commercialism and capitalism. We are taught that the more things we own, the more successful we are. We further observe this through the notion that shopping equals happiness.

Why is this a feminist issue, I hear you ask? Well, consider the relationship between females and shopping; the stereotype of women as ‘shopaholics‘ is well-established and reinforced by the philosophy that individuals that own a lot of stuff possess higher prestige and status. By going against the grain, females are gambling being judged as a lesser woman who has perhaps failed at cultural femininity.

Anyone who travels knows only too well that lugging bags upon bags of belongings wherever they go is a burden. Half the point of traveling is to detach yourself from material ownership and to feel at home – not within the four walls of a house – but by the quality of the people around you. A nomadic lifestyle is incompatible with the convention of women accumulating more and more stuff, which is all the more reason to challenge it.

Some final thoughts…

Travel provides many opportunities: the opportunity for new experiences, the opportunity to meet new people… and perhaps most importantly, the opportunity to learn.

Growing up in New Zealand, misogyny manifests in micro-aggressions. In other words, sexism is an implicit and underlying mechanism that characterises the female existence in a seemingly insignificant way (emphasis on the ‘seemingly’). But when I am in foreign places, the gender inequality can sometimes be so palpable, it’s like a slap to the face.

The downside to being a Kiwi is that it’s easy to take a relatively egalitarian society for granted. But through living in one of the more privileged countries in the world, us females have a political voice that is heard and respected. Educating first ourselves and then others about the injustices occurring in other societies is an opportunity that should not be undermined but rather encouraged.

Through a feminist approach to traveling, women become more aware and vocal of the inequalities plaguing humanity. I am a firm believer that social change is a bottom-up process, and what better way to start than by challenging the mentalities that reinforce sexist travel tropes.

Photos courtesy of Unsplash

Hungry for more? Be sure to check out my blog post: The Bucket List: Banksy’s Walled Off Hotel (Or Why Tourism is Political) 🌍

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Flight of the Butterflies: Otago Museum’s Tropical Forest

“Hundreds of butterflies flitted in and out of sight like short-lived punctuation marks in a stream of consciousness without beginning or end.”

Haruki Murakami

I’m one of those people that can wile away hours and hours in a museum. Load me with snacks and a map and I’ll quite happily potter amongst the exhibitions without once consulting the time.

The thing with having lived in the same place your entire life is that eventually you grow blind to the beauty and individuality of it. I spend all my time yearning to escape and counting down the days till I board that plane, when I have a stunning city full of possibility and wonder right on my doorstep. Cheesy, but true.

I recently hosted two lovely couch surfers for a couple of days, which was a fantastic opportunity to accompany them sightseeing and experience the New Zealand town of Dunedin through new eyes. On a miserable and cataclysmic winters day, we trudged through the storm towards the heavenly embrace of Otago Museum’s Tropical Forest.

Otago Museum is the natural, cultural and scientific jewel of Dunedin. Conveniently neighbouring the historic University of Otago, the museum has a rich diversity of yearly and seasonal exhibitions on offer. Perhaps the most unique of these is the Tropical Forest.

As it’s name suggests, the Tropical Forest in a humid oasis within the confines of the museum with its own thriving ecosystem of butterflies. Yes, you heard that right: butterflies.

The aim of this “living, tropical habitat” is to educate people about these exotic, friendly insects. It’s no wonder the attraction is such a success; by entering the enclosure, you are fully immersing yourself in the butterflies’ world. Three stories of crawling vines, blooming flowers and a majestic waterfall – yes, a waterfall – make you temporarily forget you are not in fact on an expedition through the Amazonian rainforest.

Curious butterflies dance around you as you explore the striking environment. Watch your step for birds or turtles, and don’t look too close – you might spot a tarantula. But for those who aren’t a fan of creepy crawlies, don’t fret; a thick pane of glass protects you from these eight-legged creatures (*shivers*).

The Tropical Forest is a wonderful way to spend a lazy Saturday afternoon, embrace your inner scientist or simply to escape the cold (hello 30° thermostat). The nature of the experience means that it’s appropriate and enjoyable for all ages, and I have never once been there and felt inconvenienced by crowds. Actually, the last time I went, we were the only ones there. How neat is that?!

Did you know?

  • Butterfly wings are actually clear; the patterns and colours are constructed by the reflection of microscopic scales
  • During winter, the Monarch butterfly migrates from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico – a whopping2,000 miles – before returning to the north again in the Spring
  • A group of butterflies is called a ‘flutter’

The ‘Deats

Name: The Discovery World Tropical Forest

Location: Otago Museum (419 Great King Street, Dunedin, New Zealand)

Website: http://otagomuseum.nz/whats-on/do/dwtf/

Hours: 10am-5pm

Price: $0-$10 (depending on age)

Tip: If you’re not a self-diagnosed lepidopterophobia (noun: a person who is afraid of butterflies and moths), I encourage you to surreptitiously dip your finger into one of the pottles of nectar and accept the challenge to try land a butterfly. Trust me, it makes for some stellar photograph material 👌

If you are traveling to Dunedin – or are a local searching for new ways to enjoy the southern city – don’t forget to add the unforgettable landscape of Lovers Leap to your list. For more information on this walking track, check out my blog post: Postcards from Lover’s Leap.

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The No-Bullsh*t Guide to Saving Money to Travel for Young Adults

Gather round kids, and welcome to the post that you’ll find on every travel blog!

But no, seriously. You know what I hate about these kinds of posts? They are directed at adults who have their own income and are living a lifestyle that is so far removed from the typical ‘student life’ that most advice is untransferable. These posts preach guidance such as finding a flat-mate and sacrificing the weekly nail appointment, when in reality, what young adult has enough money to fund living in a private flat in the first place, and what young adult has an extra $50 up their sleeve a week to splurge on their mani-pedi?

What’s missing from every online guide I have read is an orientation towards people my own age and walk of life.

I recently discussed on my post – Why I Hate the Word Wanderlust – how I believe that although saving to finance a trip can be “soul-crushing and demands sacrifice”, it is not impossible. I am not blind to the reality that factors such as privilege, opportunity and circumstance play a vast role in the success of this, but for the average university student who has a certain degree of flexibility and control over their time, is in a position where they are fortunate enough to put some money aside – and additionally, can prioritise this – I think that with a little self-discipline, travel isn’t as far out of reach as previously assumed.

So, sit back, relax and pull up your budget spreadsheets; you’re in for a wild ride 😎

Sharing is Caring

So I probably shouldn’t be encouraging this… and I apologise sincerely to network providers worldwide… but there’s a cheaper way to still access all your favourite tv shows.

I love Netflix. I love that I can watch my favourite shows (*ahem* Rick and Morty), and I love that I can watch them whenever the hell I want to. But you know what else I love? Leeching off my boyfriend’s account.

Yes, yes, I know. I’m that person.

Netflix can cost up to $15.99USD a month, which – while it doesn’t seem like a huge expense – can add up to nearly $200.00USD per year. If you can’t imagine curling into bed at night without seeing that iconic red logo materialise upon your laptop screen, search for a friend who is also paying for an account and inquire whether they would be happy to consider a cheaper alternative. Depending on your plan, you can access the same account on more than one device – and create individual personas – which is perfect for going halves and sharing.

Better still, stream straight from the web. Now, I’m not telling you to stream illegally… but I’m not not telling you to stream illegally. Wink wink nudge nudge.

Work, Work, Work, Work, Work…

Okay, so I can’t stand that song. But the most obvious way to make some extra dollar bills is to – yep, you guessed it – work.

When I was saving up to travel to Southeast Asia, I worked five part-time jobs on top of full-time university. As I wrote in a previous blog post, it was “social suicide – and admittedly not the best for my mental health – but it got me those plane tickets.” I know that working five part-time jobs is a little (okay, a lot) excessive, but I managed to earn $5000NZD in less than six-months without missing a single lecture.

If you’re studying in New Zealand, I highly recommend you sign up Student Job Search. This website was a life-saver for me when it came to finding part-time or casual work in the short term. Most of the listings started immediately and were updated daily, so I would log in every morning to find another selection of jobs up for grabs.

The beauty with finding employment is that it adds experience to your CV. That way, if you are looking for paid work overseas, you have the number one thing employees look for up your sleeve.

Cut the Coffee

Oh God, not the coffee!

If you’re anything like me, then you rely on your daily cup of joe to, y’know, function. Coffee is something of a necessity for university students, and don’t worry, I’m not suggesting you go cold turkey. Rather, I’m suggesting you make your own coffee at home and then take it on your whereabouts in a reusable cup for a fraction of the price rather than buy it at a café.

I am totally guilty of this. When my motivation is running low, sometime it is the promise of a delicious, steaming flat white from my favourite café that gets me out of bed in the morning. But the price difference from buying it compared to making it is ridiculous. Here’s the ridiculousness in numbers: if you are spending $3.5USD on a cup of coffee (as is the average cost in New Zealand) 5 days a week, then in 6 months, that would be saving of $455USD. $455US?! You could buy 20 nights in a standard hostel with that!

Embrace Your Inner Jaime Oliver

Whilst we’re on the topic, let’s address the elephant in the room: food.

When we make the transition from our parent’s home to a flat or other independent living situation, the freedom to make our own lifestyle choices can be almost too good to be true. If we have a few extra dollars on the side, it is tremendously tempting to forgo making a good, hearty meal from scratch and just ordering take out. This might especially be the case if we arrive home late after a long day of study, work or other commitments, and are too exhausted to attack the kitchen.

I’m not going to bore you with the maths here, but I dare say it is rather self-explanatory. As is the case with the coffee, dining out is decidedly expensive, and there is no reason why you can’t make food that tastes as good – if not better – at home.

Student Recipes is a fantastic online resource for finding delicious, budget-friendly dishes to whip up in a flash. I also recommend doing some good old fashioned food prep so that if you do find yourself getting in the door at some ungodly hour, the pizza delivery service won’t be as tempting. As long as you stick to your guns and keep takeout for special occasions (if at all), you’ll find your bank account looking more and more attractive in no time.

Happy Birthday!

If your family is keen on gift-giving at those special times of the year, don’t be afraid to ask for cold hard cash instead of a present. It may sound greedy – and even I am reluctant to employ this – but people will be delighted to know that their contribution is going to a worthy cause.

Whenever I receive money on my birthday, I always make it a priority to write to the giver and not only thank them for their kindness, but also tell them specifically what I will be putting it towards. That way, you are not only giving them a sense of purpose with their charity, but also holding yourself accountable for what you spend it on. The last thing you want to do is admit to your grandparents that you spent the money they gave you for that once-in-a-lifetime trip on three weeks worth of McDonalds.

Pop Some Tags

#throwback to 2012 and familiarise yourself with Macklemore’s Thrift Shop. It was my jam back then, I can still proudly rap along to all the words now.

The point I’m trying to make here is that shopping secondhand can be a game-changer when it comes to budgeting. This doesn’t just stop at clothing, either; it extends to textbooks (do you know how much that shit costs?!), electronics, furniture… you name it. Why would you spend retail price when you can score the same product for half of that?

Shopping secondhand doesn’t mean you have to lurk in those grotty charity shops that smell of mothballs and wet basements (you know what I’m talking about). Companies such as Amazon give you the option to buy discounted products that are still in great quality.

Once Upon a Time…

If you’re a total book worm (like me), then you should invest in a Kindle.

Did you know that the average hard-copy book (in New Zealand, at least) costs around $20USd?! An eBook costs half of that. Plus, you won’t have to lug around thick slabs of paper which sit in the corner and gather dust once you’ve finished it.

Granted, buying a Kindle device costs a wee bit, but the savings you will make from not buying hard-copy books in the long-run are exponentially worthwhile. Besides, there are certainly ways to score a discounted Kindle… what was that last point I discussed, again? 🤔

Lace Up Your Runners

Relax; I’m not about to suggest you start running. I’m not that evil. But what I am suggesting is that – if you own a car – you might want to consider alternative options.

Petrol is insanely pricey – not to mention the maintenance and service cars require on a regular basis. Then you have to pay for parking – and believe me, you haven’t experienced stress until you’re late to a lecture and can’t find a car park.

There are several methods of transport available to most city-slickers. Think walking, biking, car-pooling or catching public transport… at the extreme end of the scale, you might even consider selling your car. Imagine the budget-boost that would give you!

For example, instead of catching a taxi to town one Saturday night, consult the local bus timetable. To get to and from the centre of town, it costs me $30USD to employ the services of a private taxi but only $2USD to enjoy the company of strangers on a bus. It’s a no-brainer, really.

I understand that the ability to trade in the luxury of your car is heavily situation-dependent. If you live somewhere that has you rugging up in about five layers of clothing before you leave the house, you might want to think twice about walking. Likewise, sacrificing hours of your precious time to travel on foot might not be the best use of your time. But – as is the case with everything – it’s the little things that count.

Put Down That Wine Glass

Yeah… I’m really not going to be popular after this blog post.

I didn’t say saving is soul-crushing for nothing. For us young ‘uns, drinking is more often than not synonymous with getting wasted. I say this because in New Zealand, we have a really dangerous culture of binge-drinking, and in order to achieve this level of intoxication, it takes more than a can or two of beer.

The consequence of heavy drinking – aside from the detrimental health issues – is the effect on our wallets. Alcohol ain’t cheap, people!

The good news (depending on your perspective) is that there is an easy way to regulate your spending without going cold turkey. I don’t want to endorse unhealthy habits here, but if you insist on those big nights out, invest in pre-drinking rather than hitting up the pub. A glass of wine from the bar will cost nearly two thirds the price of a bottle purchased from the supermarket and enjoyed with your friends before venturing out into town. And don’t even get me started on the price of cocktails!

Surf Couches

If you haven’t already, open another tab, type in www.courchsurfing.com and sign up for an account now.

One of the most hideous expenses of travel – perhaps aside from those dang plane tickets – is accommodation. For many people, hotels are simply not an option, and even the going rates of some hostels make me cringe.

Couchsurfing is revolutionising budget travel for people of all walks of life. The online community connects hosts from every country on earth with adventurous and open-minded travellers. As written on their website: “travel like a local, stay in someone’s home and experience the world in a way money can’t buy”.

The key word here is money; the beauty of Couchsurfing is that you are not charged a single cent to stay in someone’s house. It’s always polite to thank your hosts in some way, but all we’re talking here is a cooked meal or shouting them a drink. Some token of gratitude. Furthermore, it’s a brilliant means to meet like-minded people and expose yourself to a different culture in a way that the four walls of a hotel suite cannot.

 

If you enjoyed this post, you might also like: the No-Bullsh*t Guide to Surviving a 12-Hour Flight ✈

All photos sourced form Unsplash

 

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