Oi Ladies, Listen Up – It’s a Bloody Revolution! (feat. GIVEAWAY)

Let’s talk periods.

That’s right… periods. Some of us are blessed with a slight monthly inconvenience; others burdened with the living incarnation of a raised middle finger. Whatever your time of the month looks like, it’s something that most of us girls have to deal with. And because of that, it’s something we should be talking about.

When I was preparing for my first independent overseas trip, I was conscious of a lot of things that I needed to pre-organise. Amongst those included applying for visas, purchasing emergency meds and putting together a first aid kit. What completely slipped my mind was the fact that I was due to get my period overseas, and would need plenty of products on hand to manage the flow. This left me with graphic memories of sprinting into a rural Vietnamese pharmacy in the middle of the night and trying to mime to the lady behind the counter – who did not speak a word of English – that I desperately needed a pack of tampons (*face-palm*). Not one of my finer moments, I will admit; but it does illustrate the glamorous reality of being a menstruating woman.

Upon returning to New Zealand, I was determined to find a solution to my forgetfulness. The fact that I rarely carry around spare pads or tampons is only exacerbated by my period refusing to commit to any sort of regular routine. That + the price of sanitary products = 👎

Enter: Oi.

Oi – Organic Initiative – is an ethical New Zealand company that sells feminine hygiene products. They have recently released the Oi Cup, a reusable and recyclable menstrual cup that functions as a natural alternative to tampons and pads. The Oi Cup sits internally in your vagina and gathers your flow for up to a whopping 12 hours. It almost sounds too good to be true – but fortunately, it isn’t.

Switching to the Oi Cup completely transformed my menstrual experience. Sure, it took a little experimenting the first cycle I used it, but after that? I’ve never looked back.

If you’re anything like me and run laps to and from the bathroom when that time of the month strikes, you might be relieved to learn that menstrual cups hold around 5 times the amount of liquid as the average tampon. For the first time, I can sleep a full, uninterrupted night and wake up without looking like I’ve just survived a shark attack.

The Oi Cup is a game changer when it comes to the environment. Did you know that it can take centuries upon centuries for sanitary products to break down in a landfill? It’s time to face the facts: pads and tampons that are made of plastic just aren’t sustainable 🙅 Unlike those pesky products, the Oi Cup bears minimal impact upon the environment.

According to an article by the Huffington Post, women spend approximately NZD$3140 on sanitary products over the course of their lifetime. $3140?! That’s insane! Do you know what you could buy with that? A 12-day Contiki tour to Mexico. Or 7 return trips from Auckland to Bali. By contrast, the Oi Cup will cost you a mere NZD$39.95 for up to 10 years of use. That’s a jaw-dropping difference of nearly $900 every decade.

I’ll just let that sink in for a bit.

The Oi Cup is the perfect companion for the female traveler. There are three ‘criteria’ that people often try to meet when traveling: pack light, spend less, and explore the off-the-beaten track. Periods are simply incompatible with these. For one, the last thing you want to be sacrificing your precious luggage space for is cumbersome boxes of sanitary products. But at the same time, you don’t want to be budgeting to spend extra money on pads and tampons (a single pad can cost up to NZD$5.60 in some countries!). Furthermore, the last thing you want is to be caught empty-handed in the middle of nowhere with no resources to deal with your period. Trust me, I’ve been there… your underwear won’t thank you 🙈

Luckily, the Oi Cup solves all of these problems. Don’t want to have to lug boxes upon boxes of sanitary products in your suitcase? One small cup ticks that box. Don’t want to have to fork out additional costs to stock up on pads and tampons? No problem. Your period decides to make a malicious return a few days earlier than expected? Oi has you covered.

If a menstrual cup just isn’t for you, then don’t fret! Oi prides itself on providing a diversity of environmentally-friendly and socially-responsible products to tackle that time of the month. Think panty liners, pads and tampons (with and without applicators).

So… just what sets Oi’s products apart from the rest of the market?

  • 100% pure certified organic cotton
  • Hypoallergenic
  • Biodegradable
  • Free from perfume, dyes, chemicals and synthetics
  • Recommended by gynaecologists, midwives and obstetricians

The team at Oi are visionaries when it comes to the relationship between women and their bodies. They aim to empower people through educated, positive choices and the ability to stand up for what they believe in.

“Oi stands for every woman, Oi stands for health and Oi stands for our world.”

To celebrate an ethical and revolutionary approach to our periods, the Ginger Passports has teamed up with Oi to host a giveaway. By following the steps below, you will go in the draw to win an Oi Cup – worth NZD$39.95 – for free!

  1. Follow the Ginger Passports on Facebook
  2. Either comment on this post OR like this Facebook post

It’s as simple as that! This giveaway will run for two weeks, and the winner will be drawn on Tuesday 13th June. Good luck!

Let’s begin the period conversation. With Oi, we are doing our bit for the planet – and our own bodies – every month without even having to think about it. Healthy habits = healthy women. It’s a bloody revolution.

The ‘Deats

Name: Organic Initiative (Oi)

Website: www.oi4me.com

Social Media: Facebook ● Instagram ● Twitter

Disclaimer: This post is in collaboration with Oi. All opinions are my own 🙋

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Vlog: Dunedin Edition

Dunedin has a special place in my heart.

I’m going to keep this post short and sweet, and let the video do the talking. I actually got quite emotional editing this, and hope that by watching this, you too will see the beauty and identity this southern New Zealand city has to offer.

Featuring…

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Traveling with the F-Word (That’s Right…Feminism)

Let’s have a little talk, shall we?

As a gender studies student, I was determined that I would somehow incorporate a blog post discussing this wonderful thing called feminism. For those of you that are not acquainted with feminism – or perhaps need a little refreshing in the midst of the anti-feminist backlash – allow me to welcome you back into the classroom.

Feminism is essentially the advocacy of women’s rights on the ground of the equality of the sexes. And when I say ‘essentially’, what I mean is that I copied and pasted that right out of the dictionary. Plagiarism points for me.

Gender equality – or inequality, I should say – bleeds into every area of life. We hear about the gender ratio in parliament, the wage gap between female and male employees, and even the extent of legal independence women should have in some parts of the world. As important as these issues are, there is a further niche where gendered assumptions and expectations permeate, however implicitly: travel.

In the travel arena, I am a very privileged individual. Pretending otherwise will not do anyone any good. I’m privileged because I grew up in a safe country rich with opportunity (shout out to New Zealand), am from a financially stable background and have a supportive family who encourage anything and everything I set my mind to. The term ‘privilege’ receives a bad reputation because it includes connotations of individuals who have never had to work a day in their life, don’t understand what it means to be confronted with setbacks, and who are generally just ‘bad people’. I acknowledge that the avenues I have taken to make progress towards my goals may not have been characterised by the hardship many other people experience, but that doesn’t automatically make me unworthy of enjoying them. Accepting that I am in a position of privilege – as uncomfortable as that process may be – affords me the opportunity to overcome the prevailing obstacle in the way of holding myself partly accountable for the injustice in today’s society.

Travel can be a feminist pursuit through many means. Anything that furthers women’s ability to achieve things that society may not necessarily acknowledge or approve of for women is a feminist issue. This article will illustrate 3 tropes which you – as a female traveler – can identify to challenge the mentalities that prevent women from participating in an equal and rewarding experience of the world 💪

The “Settle Down” Trope

You know what I’m talking about – the idea that a woman has only succeeded at being a woman if she has managed to land a job, find a man, slap a ring on her finger and pop out two or three young ‘uns. That, ladies and gentleman, is the arithmetic of womanhood. Anything that strays from this paragon means she has failed.

One of the many problems with this trope is that it doesn’t accommodate goals such as travel. How is a woman supposed to maintain a 9-5 job when she’s never in one place long enough to make the interview? How is a woman supposed to settle down if she doesn’t have the suburban house with the white picket fence? An airport is no place to raise children.

The reality is that this paradigm does not fit every woman. Truth be told, I would be surprised if any woman – or man, for that matter – was perfectly content following this preconceived course. Success is subjective, and in the words of Swami Vivekananda: “The idea of perfect womanhood is perfect independence.”

The “Vulnerable Woman” Trope

“But is it safe? You know… for a woman?” 

“Will you have a man with you?”

“No parent wants their daughter alone in a foreign country – you’re being selfish!”

If any of these sound familiar to you, then you will have been exposed to the Vulnerable Woman Trope. This is the one where – upon announcing your travel plans – people automatically latch onto the implications of your gender.

Now, I’m not stupid. I know that there are some places in the world that it would be simply irresponsible to venture alone. But there are also a lot of places that – while they certainly carry their risks – should not be off-limits for someone purely because they identify as a woman and not a man.

Statistics illustrate how men are actually twice as likely to experience violent assault committed by strangers than women. Yet, you rarely hear people warning their fellow male friends to avoid traveling alone. This fixation on the danger of solo female traveling only disseminates the cultural falsehood not only of women as vulnerable and helpless beings, but also of the conceptual impossibility of men as victims of crime. These ideas work to scare women out of expanding their comfort zone, and are all but an invitation for victim-blaming if a woman does happen to be assaulted whilst traveling on her own.

The take home message is that you should not let misogynistic stereotypes around female independence limit your opportunities. No one should travel somewhere without educating themselves on personal protection and welfare, and consulting the social and political landscape of any prospective country before booking those plane tickets should be a priority. Bear in mind that gendered advice around security can be delivered more for the purpose of reaffirming the Vulnerable Woman Trope rather than actually presenting a realistic view of safety. Traveling alone can be a rewarding and empowering experience – for both women and men – and we need to understand that threats to this independence are not all that meets then eye.

P.S. a fantastic resource for genuine advice on street harassment whilst traveling is this article by Everyday Feminism.

 

The “Woman = Things” Trope

When I was preparing to move overseas for the first time, I pulled a Marie Kondo and down-sized my possessions to the point where I could fit everything I owned into one suitcase. When I would share this with my friends, they would be astounded and ask how I could get rid of so much shit. And that’s what I want to emphasise – that it really was ‘shit’. It may have been shit I was admittedly attached to, but it was nevertheless shit. When it came down to it, I didn’t really need five pairs of Nikes. Nor did I really need three sets of reusable coffee flasks. Once I accepted that, a more minimalist lifestyle suddenly became a lot more appealing.

Society is obsessed with ‘things’ – and by ‘things’, I mean anything that you can buy/own. We tend to hierarchise people based on money; a habit propagated by commercialism and capitalism. We are taught that the more things we own, the more successful we are. We further observe this through the notion that shopping equals happiness.

Why is this a feminist issue, I hear you ask? Well, consider the relationship between females and shopping; the stereotype of women as ‘shopaholics‘ is well-established and reinforced by the philosophy that individuals that own a lot of stuff possess higher prestige and status. By going against the grain, females are gambling being judged as a lesser woman who has perhaps failed at cultural femininity.

Anyone who travels knows only too well that lugging bags upon bags of belongings wherever they go is a burden. Half the point of traveling is to detach yourself from material ownership and to feel at home – not within the four walls of a house – but by the quality of the people around you. A nomadic lifestyle is incompatible with the convention of women accumulating more and more stuff, which is all the more reason to challenge it.

Some final thoughts…

Travel provides many opportunities: the opportunity for new experiences, the opportunity to meet new people… and perhaps most importantly, the opportunity to learn.

Growing up in New Zealand, misogyny manifests in micro-aggressions. In other words, sexism is an implicit and underlying mechanism that characterises the female existence in a seemingly insignificant way (emphasis on the ‘seemingly’). But when I am in foreign places, the gender inequality can sometimes be so palpable, it’s like a slap to the face.

The downside to being a Kiwi is that it’s easy to take a relatively egalitarian society for granted. But through living in one of the more privileged countries in the world, us females have a political voice that is heard and respected. Educating first ourselves and then others about the injustices occurring in other societies is an opportunity that should not be undermined but rather encouraged.

Through a feminist approach to traveling, women become more aware and vocal of the inequalities plaguing humanity. I am a firm believer that social change is a bottom-up process, and what better way to start than by challenging the mentalities that reinforce sexist travel tropes.

Photos courtesy of Unsplash

Hungry for more? Be sure to check out my blog post: The Bucket List: Banksy’s Walled Off Hotel (Or Why Tourism is Political) 🌍

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Flight of the Butterflies: Otago Museum’s Tropical Forest

“Hundreds of butterflies flitted in and out of sight like short-lived punctuation marks in a stream of consciousness without beginning or end.”

Haruki Murakami

I’m one of those people that can wile away hours and hours in a museum. Load me with snacks and a map and I’ll quite happily potter amongst the exhibitions without once consulting the time.

The thing with having lived in the same place your entire life is that eventually you grow blind to the beauty and individuality of it. I spend all my time yearning to escape and counting down the days till I board that plane, when I have a stunning city full of possibility and wonder right on my doorstep. Cheesy, but true.

I recently hosted two lovely couch surfers for a couple of days, which was a fantastic opportunity to accompany them sightseeing and experience the New Zealand town of Dunedin through new eyes. On a miserable and cataclysmic winters day, we trudged through the storm towards the heavenly embrace of Otago Museum’s Tropical Forest.

Otago Museum is the natural, cultural and scientific jewel of Dunedin. Conveniently neighbouring the historic University of Otago, the museum has a rich diversity of yearly and seasonal exhibitions on offer. Perhaps the most unique of these is the Tropical Forest.

As it’s name suggests, the Tropical Forest in a humid oasis within the confines of the museum with its own thriving ecosystem of butterflies. Yes, you heard that right: butterflies.

The aim of this “living, tropical habitat” is to educate people about these exotic, friendly insects. It’s no wonder the attraction is such a success; by entering the enclosure, you are fully immersing yourself in the butterflies’ world. Three stories of crawling vines, blooming flowers and a majestic waterfall – yes, a waterfall – make you temporarily forget you are not in fact on an expedition through the Amazonian rainforest.

Curious butterflies dance around you as you explore the striking environment. Watch your step for birds or turtles, and don’t look too close – you might spot a tarantula. But for those who aren’t a fan of creepy crawlies, don’t fret; a thick pane of glass protects you from these eight-legged creatures (*shivers*).

The Tropical Forest is a wonderful way to spend a lazy Saturday afternoon, embrace your inner scientist or simply to escape the cold (hello 30° thermostat). The nature of the experience means that it’s appropriate and enjoyable for all ages, and I have never once been there and felt inconvenienced by crowds. Actually, the last time I went, we were the only ones there. How neat is that?!

Did you know?

  • Butterfly wings are actually clear; the patterns and colours are constructed by the reflection of microscopic scales
  • During winter, the Monarch butterfly migrates from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico – a whopping2,000 miles – before returning to the north again in the Spring
  • A group of butterflies is called a ‘flutter’

The ‘Deats

Name: The Discovery World Tropical Forest

Location: Otago Museum (419 Great King Street, Dunedin, New Zealand)

Website: http://otagomuseum.nz/whats-on/do/dwtf/

Hours: 10am-5pm

Price: $0-$10 (depending on age)

Tip: If you’re not a self-diagnosed lepidopterophobia (noun: a person who is afraid of butterflies and moths), I encourage you to surreptitiously dip your finger into one of the pottles of nectar and accept the challenge to try land a butterfly. Trust me, it makes for some stellar photograph material 👌

If you are traveling to Dunedin – or are a local searching for new ways to enjoy the southern city – don’t forget to add the unforgettable landscape of Lovers Leap to your list. For more information on this walking track, check out my blog post: Postcards from Lover’s Leap.

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The No-Bullsh*t Guide to Saving Money to Travel for Young Adults

Gather round kids, and welcome to the post that you’ll find on every travel blog!

But no, seriously. You know what I hate about these kinds of posts? They are directed at adults who have their own income and are living a lifestyle that is so far removed from the typical ‘student life’ that most advice is untransferable. These posts preach guidance such as finding a flat-mate and sacrificing the weekly nail appointment, when in reality, what young adult has enough money to fund living in a private flat in the first place, and what young adult has an extra $50 up their sleeve a week to splurge on their mani-pedi?

What’s missing from every online guide I have read is an orientation towards people my own age and walk of life.

I recently discussed on my post – Why I Hate the Word Wanderlust – how I believe that although saving to finance a trip can be “soul-crushing and demands sacrifice”, it is not impossible. I am not blind to the reality that factors such as privilege, opportunity and circumstance play a vast role in the success of this, but for the average university student who has a certain degree of flexibility and control over their time, is in a position where they are fortunate enough to put some money aside – and additionally, can prioritise this – I think that with a little self-discipline, travel isn’t as far out of reach as previously assumed.

So, sit back, relax and pull up your budget spreadsheets; you’re in for a wild ride 😎

Sharing is Caring

So I probably shouldn’t be encouraging this… and I apologise sincerely to network providers worldwide… but there’s a cheaper way to still access all your favourite tv shows.

I love Netflix. I love that I can watch my favourite shows (*ahem* Rick and Morty), and I love that I can watch them whenever the hell I want to. But you know what else I love? Leeching off my boyfriend’s account.

Yes, yes, I know. I’m that person.

Netflix can cost up to $15.99USD a month, which – while it doesn’t seem like a huge expense – can add up to nearly $200.00USD per year. If you can’t imagine curling into bed at night without seeing that iconic red logo materialise upon your laptop screen, search for a friend who is also paying for an account and inquire whether they would be happy to consider a cheaper alternative. Depending on your plan, you can access the same account on more than one device – and create individual personas – which is perfect for going halves and sharing.

Better still, stream straight from the web. Now, I’m not telling you to stream illegally… but I’m not not telling you to stream illegally. Wink wink nudge nudge.

Work, Work, Work, Work, Work…

Okay, so I can’t stand that song. But the most obvious way to make some extra dollar bills is to – yep, you guessed it – work.

When I was saving up to travel to Southeast Asia, I worked five part-time jobs on top of full-time university. As I wrote in a previous blog post, it was “social suicide – and admittedly not the best for my mental health – but it got me those plane tickets.” I know that working five part-time jobs is a little (okay, a lot) excessive, but I managed to earn $5000NZD in less than six-months without missing a single lecture.

If you’re studying in New Zealand, I highly recommend you sign up Student Job Search. This website was a life-saver for me when it came to finding part-time or casual work in the short term. Most of the listings started immediately and were updated daily, so I would log in every morning to find another selection of jobs up for grabs.

The beauty with finding employment is that it adds experience to your CV. That way, if you are looking for paid work overseas, you have the number one thing employees look for up your sleeve.

Cut the Coffee

Oh God, not the coffee!

If you’re anything like me, then you rely on your daily cup of joe to, y’know, function. Coffee is something of a necessity for university students, and don’t worry, I’m not suggesting you go cold turkey. Rather, I’m suggesting you make your own coffee at home and then take it on your whereabouts in a reusable cup for a fraction of the price rather than buy it at a café.

I am totally guilty of this. When my motivation is running low, sometime it is the promise of a delicious, steaming flat white from my favourite café that gets me out of bed in the morning. But the price difference from buying it compared to making it is ridiculous. Here’s the ridiculousness in numbers: if you are spending $3.5USD on a cup of coffee (as is the average cost in New Zealand) 5 days a week, then in 6 months, that would be saving of $455USD. $455US?! You could buy 20 nights in a standard hostel with that!

Embrace Your Inner Jaime Oliver

Whilst we’re on the topic, let’s address the elephant in the room: food.

When we make the transition from our parent’s home to a flat or other independent living situation, the freedom to make our own lifestyle choices can be almost too good to be true. If we have a few extra dollars on the side, it is tremendously tempting to forgo making a good, hearty meal from scratch and just ordering take out. This might especially be the case if we arrive home late after a long day of study, work or other commitments, and are too exhausted to attack the kitchen.

I’m not going to bore you with the maths here, but I dare say it is rather self-explanatory. As is the case with the coffee, dining out is decidedly expensive, and there is no reason why you can’t make food that tastes as good – if not better – at home.

Student Recipes is a fantastic online resource for finding delicious, budget-friendly dishes to whip up in a flash. I also recommend doing some good old fashioned food prep so that if you do find yourself getting in the door at some ungodly hour, the pizza delivery service won’t be as tempting. As long as you stick to your guns and keep takeout for special occasions (if at all), you’ll find your bank account looking more and more attractive in no time.

Happy Birthday!

If your family is keen on gift-giving at those special times of the year, don’t be afraid to ask for cold hard cash instead of a present. It may sound greedy – and even I am reluctant to employ this – but people will be delighted to know that their contribution is going to a worthy cause.

Whenever I receive money on my birthday, I always make it a priority to write to the giver and not only thank them for their kindness, but also tell them specifically what I will be putting it towards. That way, you are not only giving them a sense of purpose with their charity, but also holding yourself accountable for what you spend it on. The last thing you want to do is admit to your grandparents that you spent the money they gave you for that once-in-a-lifetime trip on three weeks worth of McDonalds.

Pop Some Tags

#throwback to 2012 and familiarise yourself with Macklemore’s Thrift Shop. It was my jam back then, I can still proudly rap along to all the words now.

The point I’m trying to make here is that shopping secondhand can be a game-changer when it comes to budgeting. This doesn’t just stop at clothing, either; it extends to textbooks (do you know how much that shit costs?!), electronics, furniture… you name it. Why would you spend retail price when you can score the same product for half of that?

Shopping secondhand doesn’t mean you have to lurk in those grotty charity shops that smell of mothballs and wet basements (you know what I’m talking about). Companies such as Amazon give you the option to buy discounted products that are still in great quality.

Once Upon a Time…

If you’re a total book worm (like me), then you should invest in a Kindle.

Did you know that the average hard-copy book (in New Zealand, at least) costs around $20USd?! An eBook costs half of that. Plus, you won’t have to lug around thick slabs of paper which sit in the corner and gather dust once you’ve finished it.

Granted, buying a Kindle device costs a wee bit, but the savings you will make from not buying hard-copy books in the long-run are exponentially worthwhile. Besides, there are certainly ways to score a discounted Kindle… what was that last point I discussed, again? 🤔

Lace Up Your Runners

Relax; I’m not about to suggest you start running. I’m not that evil. But what I am suggesting is that – if you own a car – you might want to consider alternative options.

Petrol is insanely pricey – not to mention the maintenance and service cars require on a regular basis. Then you have to pay for parking – and believe me, you haven’t experienced stress until you’re late to a lecture and can’t find a car park.

There are several methods of transport available to most city-slickers. Think walking, biking, car-pooling or catching public transport… at the extreme end of the scale, you might even consider selling your car. Imagine the budget-boost that would give you!

For example, instead of catching a taxi to town one Saturday night, consult the local bus timetable. To get to and from the centre of town, it costs me $30USD to employ the services of a private taxi but only $2USD to enjoy the company of strangers on a bus. It’s a no-brainer, really.

I understand that the ability to trade in the luxury of your car is heavily situation-dependent. If you live somewhere that has you rugging up in about five layers of clothing before you leave the house, you might want to think twice about walking. Likewise, sacrificing hours of your precious time to travel on foot might not be the best use of your time. But – as is the case with everything – it’s the little things that count.

Put Down That Wine Glass

Yeah… I’m really not going to be popular after this blog post.

I didn’t say saving is soul-crushing for nothing. For us young ‘uns, drinking is more often than not synonymous with getting wasted. I say this because in New Zealand, we have a really dangerous culture of binge-drinking, and in order to achieve this level of intoxication, it takes more than a can or two of beer.

The consequence of heavy drinking – aside from the detrimental health issues – is the effect on our wallets. Alcohol ain’t cheap, people!

The good news (depending on your perspective) is that there is an easy way to regulate your spending without going cold turkey. I don’t want to endorse unhealthy habits here, but if you insist on those big nights out, invest in pre-drinking rather than hitting up the pub. A glass of wine from the bar will cost nearly two thirds the price of a bottle purchased from the supermarket and enjoyed with your friends before venturing out into town. And don’t even get me started on the price of cocktails!

Surf Couches

If you haven’t already, open another tab, type in www.courchsurfing.com and sign up for an account now.

One of the most hideous expenses of travel – perhaps aside from those dang plane tickets – is accommodation. For many people, hotels are simply not an option, and even the going rates of some hostels make me cringe.

Couchsurfing is revolutionising budget travel for people of all walks of life. The online community connects hosts from every country on earth with adventurous and open-minded travellers. As written on their website: “travel like a local, stay in someone’s home and experience the world in a way money can’t buy”.

The key word here is money; the beauty of Couchsurfing is that you are not charged a single cent to stay in someone’s house. It’s always polite to thank your hosts in some way, but all we’re talking here is a cooked meal or shouting them a drink. Some token of gratitude. Furthermore, it’s a brilliant means to meet like-minded people and expose yourself to a different culture in a way that the four walls of a hotel suite cannot.

 

If you enjoyed this post, you might also like: the No-Bullsh*t Guide to Surviving a 12-Hour Flight ✈

All photos sourced form Unsplash

 

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Brew-tiful: Nectar Espresso Bar & Café

“As long as there was coffee in the world, how bad could things be?”

Cassandra Clare

It’s been a while since I reviewed a café. You might remember my blog post on Starfish from way back in January, where I discussed the thriving café culture in the New Zealand city of Dunedin. I was determined to bust the camera out at least once more before buying that one way ticket out of here, and my nose led me to Nectar.

I don’t consider myself a coffee maestro, but in saying that, I know a good cup of joe when I see (…drink?) one. Nectar Espresso Bar and Café specialises in brewing high quality coffee roasted right here in Middle Earth. The barista also scores brownie points for going out of their way to concoct an iced coffee for me that didn’t pre-exist on their menu – and they served it in a mason jar. It made all my hipster dreams come true.

The Nectar philosophy towards food is free-range, gourmet and delicious. They also cater to vegetarians, gluten free-ers… you name it. They’re also open to special requests and will go out of their way to accommodate your wants and needs. Oh, and did I mention the presentation of the food is insane?! Honestly, I feel like I’m dining in some five star Parisian restaurant. It’s pretty awesome considering the menu here won’t break your budget.

Nectar offers a warm and inviting environment that embraces you like a warm hug – especially during the depths of winter. A make or break feature for me when it comes to cafés are their design. It doesn’t matter how divine the food is; if the aesthetic doesn’t tell a story, I’m not convinced. Fortunately, Nectar passes this test with flying colours. A palette of white, yellow and green sweeps through the interior, and the rich motif of plants keep things fresh and natural.

This is a sublime place to celebrate special occasions. For a more industrial Tuscan atmosphere, venture out onto the landing at the top of the steps. There is also a sun-drenched bench at the front of the café decked out with the latest newspapers and magazines. As Nectar is located in the business district, I always see workers pop in for a morning caffeine hit or lunch break and enjoy their takeaway coffee upon the stools, taking in the sights of the bustling street outside.

My Nectar Brunch Order

  • Iced Coffee
  • Poached Free Range Eggs w/ Mushrooms, Grilled Vine Tomato and House-Made Hash-Browns
  • Birdseed Slice

Tip: Ask for your iced coffee with ice cubes sans cream. I’ve found that different countries take very different approaches to this cold beverage, and – if your taste buds are anything like mine – that is either a very good thing or a very, very bad thing. In New Zealand, an iced coffee is more like a Starbucks-esque frappuccino than, y’know, a coffee with ice. It always pays to take the time to clarify what you are actually ordering with your barista to avoid disappointment.

The ‘Deats

Name: Nectar Espresso Bar and Café

Websitewww.nectarespresso.co.nz

Facebook: @nectarespresso

Location: 286 Princes Street, Dunedin, New Zealand

Phone: 03 477 8976

Hours: 8am – 3pm

If you are a coffee enthusiast like me, then be sure to check out my blog post: You Can’t Buy Happiness… But You Can Buy Vietnamese Coffee ☕

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Revue de CITIx60 Guides: Paris

Bonjour my lovely readers! In anticipation of my forthcoming trip to Paris (*squeals*), I have been researching for and planning my itinerary like a crazy woman. In doing so, I have found myself hunting for an alternative travel book for some inspiration.

My search for an alternative travel book arose when I finally came to terms with my dislike towards the travel giants. I’m talking TripAdvisor, Lonely Planet... you get the gist. Now, I’m not completely trashing these companies – they offer insightful information on some of the most renowned and iconic attractions – but that might just be the problem. They offer tourist traps. When I venture somewhere new, I don’t want to be queued up behind dozens of other camera-hugging, fannypack-wearing holidaymakers (sorry, not sorry). In conducting my research, I want to see the side to Paris that extends further than the Eiffel Tower.

My prayers were answered with CITIx60’s City Guide to Paris.

This darling pocket-sized book was published by viction:ary, a creative company that specialises in visual art and design as inspired by all corners of the globe. It breaks down the city of love into five different categories: architecture, art spaces, shops/markets, eateries and entertainment.

Not only is the book aesthetically beautiful and simply delightful, but it is practical as well. Merely a few pages in, it informs you on basic yet essential information such as the currency, maps, public transport, emergency numbers, airport transfers and a monthly festival guide.

“Fearless and confident, Paris elegantly balances a forward thinking mentality with pride for its endearing and complex history. Always one step ahead, the capital is a cultural tastemaker, habitually setting the standard for new developments in art, architecture, food, music and fashion. International influences sit comfortably alongside quintessential Parisian character, giving the city cutting-edge cuisine, vast markets, charming vintage outlets and a booming night scene that is impossible to ignore.”

Highlights

Le Comptoir Général

This ghetto museum showcases “creative and marginal cultures from Africa” and hosts a bar, greenhouse, canteen, shopping, cinema screenings, exhibitions, concerts… the list doesn’t end! I think you really have to experience this place to understand what it’s all about.

Image courtesy of Pinterest.

Ofr.

This “quintessential French community space” is heaven for artists, designers, filmmakers and publishers alike. Ofr will keep anyone engrossed for hours through their galleries, library and assorted rotational exhibitions.

Image courtesy of Shopikon.

Grande Mosquée de Paris

Given the cultural tensions brewing in France at the moment, I think it is more important than ever to support diversity. Grande Mosqueé de Paris is the third-largest mosque in Europe and showcases stunning Hispano-Mooresque architecture.

Image courtesy of the List Love.

Colette

If Ofr hasn’t quenched your thirst for the shops, immerse yourself in some retail theory at Colette. This concept store will bring joy to those delighted by music, publications, boutique fashion and more… something tells me I don’t want to bring my credit card here.

Image courtesy of the Global Blue.

The ‘Deats

Name: Paris by CITIx60

Platform: Book

Publisher: viction:ary

Price: $11.95USD

Website: www.victionary.com

For those who can’t get enough of this book (like me), then fear not! CITIx60 has published further editions capturing the creative essence of cities such as Amsterdam, Barcelona, New York, Stockholm… you name it. Order them here!

P.S. If you enjoyed this review, you might also find that this post tickles your fancy.

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A Mountain Baptism at 7000ft

I’m not one for spontaneity – and that’s not exactly a good thing. But when my lovely friend Becky (who you might remember from this stellar interview) suggested we go climb a mountain, who was I to say no?

Let me set the scene for you. During the university break, I escaped the mundanity of urban routine to the wine-soaked town of Cromwell. It just so happened that Becky had traveled to the town over. Naturally, we decided to meet up and go on some good old fashioned adventuring. And so it was that one balmy Saturday morning, Becky and I jumped into my car and set off towards the shadow of the Remarkables, a flask of mulled wine in one hand and a drink bottle in the other (because, y’know, we’re responsible drinkers).

For those of you who aren’t familiar with the New Zealand landscape, the 7000ft Remarkables are an aptly-named mountain range located on the southeastern shore of Lake Wakatipu and a ten minute drive from the adrenaline capital of Queenstown. During the winter months, the Remarkables are blanketed in a powdery layer of snow and transform into a gem of a ski-field. But at this time of the year, travellers are treated to a rustic canvas of alpine undergrowth and jaw-dropping views.

One of the features that lured us to the Remarkables was Lake Alta, a small glacial lake nestled amongst the peaks. Symbolic of new beginnings in the coming months (stay tuned!), Becky had joked that we might baptise ourselves in the water when we reached it. I liked the idea but nevertheless snorted in response. Me, swimming in a glacial lake? Please.

Famous last words.

Under a crisp blue sky, we parked at the base of the deserted ski resort and began our ascent. After the initial revelation that I am embarrassingly unfit, we settled into a comfortable yet spritely pace. I have never really been heavily involved (or even lightly involved, to tell the truth) in any sort of hiking, but could certainly understand the appeal to it. A highlight for me included navigating our way up an almost vertical rockscape and questioning every step of the way why I had made the conscious decision to impose this upon myself.

I don’t think I am likely to forget the sensation of busting my gut to reach the summit – practically crawling on hands and knees – for the stupendous Central Otago landscape to fall into view. Having actually earned the view was unbelievably rewarding, and I had to take a moment at the top just to breathe and take in the sight.

With clothing clinging to our clammy skin (how’s that for an alliteration?) we climbed down from the peak and descended upon Lake Atlas. I don’t think I’d ever laid eyes on water so clear. Sheltered from the wind by the surrounding crags, the surface of the lake was undisturbed and inviting, the water a tremendous tinge of turquoise (blimey, I’m on a roll).

Without further ado – or warning – Becky began stripping off. When she were naked and her clothes crumpled at her feet, she began wading shamelessly into the lake. Apparently this whole re-awakening/baptism business was more than an entertained thought.

“Take the damn photo!” she demanded while I gawked, my camera buried in my pocket. Her voice betrayed the cold. Laughing, I got my act together and began snapping away madly. Unencumbered by expectations, Becky extended her arms and embraced the invigorating mountain air.

I was next. Once Becky had clambered back out of the lake and dressed herself, there was really no excuse I could avail. Surprising even myself, I climbed out of my deliciously cosy clothes and waded tentatively into the depths. The biting, mind-numbing water sucked hungrily at my legs, and the possibility crossed my mind that I might not actually be able to convince my limbs to walk out again. It wasn’t just cold, it was painful. But still, I made myself stay put, and the endorphins that skyrocket afterwards were second to none.

Becky and I rewarded our efforts by opening the flask of mulled wine we had brought. Basking in the sun on a slab of stone lakeside, we sipped away, soaked in the landscape and discussed new beginnings. If hiking up a 7000ft mountain and taking a glacial plunge was what it took to experience such satisfaction… well, maybe I could get used to this.

If these photos have tickled your fancy, then be sure to check out my Central Otago Vlog featuring more footage of the hike – and subscribe to the Ginger Passports YouTube Channel!

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The Bucket List: Riad Yasmine

Whilst the entirety of this world is on my list, anyone who knows me will be able to tell you that the one place I long to travel to – like no other – is Morocco.

One of the many reasons for this is that travellers have the opportunity to stay in a riad. A riad – unique to Morocco – is a “large traditional house built around a central courtyard, often converted into a hotel” (cheers, dictionary). Morocco has many riads on offer, but there is one that arguably stands out from the rest.

Enter: Riad Yasmine.

“Enter the crossed threshold and escape the heat and vibrancy of Marrakech. Let yourself be guided by the cool air corridor leading you to the traditional patio. You will be enveloped by its bright and quiet atmosphere where only the chirping of birds comes to disturb the silence. Throughout your stay in the red city, the Riad Yasmine will be your safe haven of peace, a timeless nest preserved from the bustle of the medina.”

Photo courtesy of Riad Yasmine

The boutique hotel – which has been described as an “oasis within the chaos of the medina” – owes it’s iconography to it’s exquisite Moorish architecture and design. Characterised by a motif of white and olive green tiles, the riad enjoys sweeping courtyards and a mosaic dipping pool.

Photo courtesy of Bon Traveler

Guests are spoilt for choice with seven individually-decorated rooms. With the riad located mere footsteps from some of the best sites in the Moroccan capital of Marrakech. Riad Yasmine is as photogenic as it is special, and has met an impressive reception of travellers who praise the owner’s intimate and extensive approach to hospitality.

Photo courtesy of Bon Traveler

I’m trying to refrain from describing Riad Yasmine as Insta-worthy… but yeah, it’s Insta-worthy. From my research, I would advise booking far in advance – to describe the riad as popular would be an understatement!

Highlights:

  • Sipping on mint tea poolside
  • Basking in the Moroccan sunset over the medina from the roof

Photo courtesy of Ohh Couture

The ‘Deats:

Name: Riad Yasmine

Website: http://riad-yasmine.com/en/

Location: 209 rue Ank Jemel، Bab Taghzout، Marrakesh 40000, Morocco

Contact: +212 5243-77012

Photo courtesy of Ohh Couture

Be sure to check out my two previous posts in the Ginger Passports’ Bucket List series: Villa Ariana Grande and Banksy’s Walled Off Hotel 👌

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How to Fall in Love with Cromwell (In 5 Easy Steps)

Step One: Take a Step Back in Time…

Cromwell – located deep in the heart of Central Otago – pays tribute to its rich heritage with a precinct called Old Cromwell Town. Here, you’ll find art galleries, cafés and boutique shops all operating out of authentic historic buildings. The heritage precinct – also known as “Central Otago’s best kept secret” – overlooks the stunning Lake Dunstan and hosts the Cromwell Farmer’s Market (catch it every Sunday from 9am-1pm over the warmer months).

Step Two: Save Water, Drink Wine

“One should always be drunk. That’s all that matters… but with what? With wine, with poetry, or with virtue, as you choose. But get drunk.” – Charles Baudelaire

I like to think of Cromwell as the Barossa Valley of New Zealand. It may not be as vast nor as renowned, but does that really matter as far as excellent wine is concerned?

Cromwell is celebrated for it’s orchards and it’s not hard to see why; a patchwork of vineyards cloak the bountiful landscape, and the view is almost as sweet as the taste. My winery loyalties are divided between Mt Difficulty and Scott Base. You’ll find the former perched above Bannockburn whilst the latter is a short walk from ‘the fruit’ (as seen in Step 5).

Step Three: Fall for Cromwell

Hehe – geddit? Fall? Well, you Americans may have caught my embarrassing pun, but us Kiwis might need a ‘lil helping hand.

The best time to visit Cromwell is in autumn. Between the months of March – May, you may miss cooking like a baked potato in the summer heat, but you will be treated to a rustic palette of nutmeg leaves and amber dusks. My favourite time of the day is late afternoon when the sky blushes, the sun sinks low upon the horizon and you would be forgiven for mistaking the mountains to have caught fire.

Step Four: 5 a Day Keeps the Doctor Away

(Okay, so there’s only 4 here, but you catch the gist.)

There is perhaps nothing more iconic about Cromwell than the enormous painted fruit sculpture on the main road. The gigantic pear, apple, orange and – I think nectarine? – welcome you into the town that is famed for it’s abundance of orchards. You haven’t had the full Central Otago experience until you’ve gone cherry picking at Cheeki Cherries, or demolished a blueberry real-fruit ice cream from Freeway Orchard.

Step Five: Say Cheese!

Cheese is one of the best goddamn things on earth and you cannot convince me otherwise.

Nothing goes better with a good old glass of pinot noir than a slab of gorgonzola, and what better place to enjoy a succulent cheese platter than Cromwell? The beauty featured below is from Scott Base Vineyards, which I enjoyed one balmy evening preceding my reluctant journey home.

If you’re keen to see some more of what Cromwell has to offer in action, then check out my Central Otago Travel Vlog – and don’t forget to show the love and subscribe to the Ginger Passport’s YouTube Channel!

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