6 Things I’ve Learned in 6 Months as a Travel Blogger

It’s hard to believe that it was a whole six months ago that I launched the Ginger Passports. I feel as though it was just the other week that I was frustratingly trying to work out what hosting platforms and domain names were (*cue traumatic technological flashbacks*). Fortunately, the good times have far outweighed the bad, and I’m still here going strong 💪

To celebrate 182 days (give or take) as a travel blogger, I’ve rounded up the six most significant things I have learned along the way. Whether you use these as inspiration for starting your own blogging enterprise, or you’re simply curious, I hope everyone can take something away from this post!

I remember how when I was conducting my own research into personal experiences of blogging before I decided to take the big leap, a recurring theme connecting all bloggers was their insistence on being driven by passion rather than forces such as money. I would roll my eyes, both at the cheesiness and seeming impracticality of that advice.

Well, it just so turns out that the joke is on me, because the only thing you can rely on in this endeavour is your own enthusiasm. When you enter the blogging sphere, it’s easy to be blinded by the potential for making revenue and enjoying free perks such as sponsored products. Whilst I have certainly reaped the benefits of the latter, I would be lying through my teeth if I said that those perks make everything worth it. I have invested hours upon hours into this blog, and at the end of the day, I have relatively little to show in terms of earnings. Well… little. Well… none. But the point is, I have also loved every single minute of it, and that knowledge in itself is enough to drive me forwards.

To quote the Beatles, “I get by with a little help from my friends”.

I may be confident creating content, but I am certainly no expert when it comes to technology. Truth be told, the reason it took me so long to actually get a blog up and running was because I couldn’t navigate the technicalities. Hosting platform? Domain name? Bitch please, I struggle to operate my TV remote.

Fortunately for me, I was approached by a good friend who studies IT, and was offered his services. We have been working together for most of 2017, and the Ginger Passports has certainly benefited from it. Without him, I would probably still be on wordpress.com with a website looking as though it were designed by a fourth grader.

Long story short, what I’m trying to communicate here is that sometimes you just need to put your pride to one side and ask for help (or accept it, in my case). Furthermore, there’s something undeniably rewarding about being part of a team. It can get awfully lonely otherwise.

When I was first developing this blog, I – being as stubborn as I am – was hell-bent that I would publish a new post three times a week regardless of circumstances. Oh, if only.

Tying back into the first point about passion, sticking to a schedule in a context such as this relies largely on motivation. If you wake up on Sunday morning, realise that you have only published two posts in the past seven days, but cannot for the life of you find a couple of hours to draft something up between all of your other commitments, then guess what? You’re not the massive failure you think you are.

I have the luxury of not being held accountable by anyone for missing my weekly goal of three posts – save perhaps myself, who is a pretty merciless judge. Unrealistic expectations aside, this luxury means I have the flexibility to roll with the punches and write when the mood takes me. Generally, my passion for blogging squeezes out at least two posts a week, but that’s not always the case. And you know what? That’s okay. If I sacrificed the joy of flexible blogging to meet my tri-weekly goal right from the outset, I would not be here six months later writing this post.

I’m talking about the two C’s here: content and collaborations.

Regarding content, there have been some subject matters I have written about that I was scared would backfire and earn a negative reception. Likewise, there were some that dealt with issues I don’t have a knowledge base in, and wasn’t entirely confident writing about. Nevertheless, I gritted my teeth and clicked ‘publish’. I figured that I have to start somewhere, and I can’t just discuss travel playlists and Balinese villas named after Ariana Grande for the rest of my blogging career.

Collaborating was also an intimidating prospect for me. Infact, it wasn’t until a couple of months ago that I finally mustered the courage to start emailing brands and bloggers about the possibility of working together. Now, I’m not trying to deceive you; I estimate that approximately 90% of those that I reach out to either ignore or politely decline my offers. But the key point worthy of highlighting here is that 10% accepted. There are plenty of exciting projects in the works thanks to those 10%; you might have already read about my campaign with Organic Initiative. Not unlike creating content that exceeded my comfort zone, I took risks and they paid off.

I welcome any excuse to channel my inner Monica Gellar.

Perhaps the most important resource I use to keep my blog developing is planning. The easiest way to lose track of your goals is not to have any, but setting those goals is only half the job. The other half entails actually working out how to achieve them.

As I have mentioned numerous times over the course of this post, my goal is to publish (roughly) three posts per week. I manage to reach that goal most of the time (*cough*) by planning in advance. On the last day of each month, I set aside time to brainstorm which posts I will write, and on what days I shall publish them. On a similar note, I also track my blog statistics on this same day for the past month, compare these figures with other months, analyse what were the strengths and weaknesses and decide how I can capitalise on these in future.

Planning is not only productive, but thoroughly gratifying as well. There’s nothing like ticking off the tasks on your to do list one by one, and the sense of accomplishment you gain is yet another of those driving forces behind your motivation.

I know, I know… that sounds absolutely bonkers. That’s like saying ‘you don’t have to wear make up to be a make up blogger’.

But it’s true! The beauty of travel blogging is that a majority of your readership are not going to be from where you live. I call New Zealand home, and have received so many lovely messages from readers across the globe asking about this beautiful country. I have written so many posts about Dunedin without having to travel more than ten minutes from my front door. By viewing the city through the lens of an outsider, I have actually felt like a tourist. It was something I didn’t think I would ever have the opportunity to experience.

I have also enjoyed writing about things that extend beyond geographical location. Some of my favourite posts include 5 Travel Tattoos That Don’t Scream PINTEREST and the No-Bullsh*t Guide to Saving Money to Travel for Young Adults, both of which did not require me to buy a plane ticket or even sacrifice the warmth and comfort of my bed.

I have gone six months without traveling (save for a sneaky wee trip three hours west to Central Otago) and still have ideas up my sleeve for future blog posts. Travel blogging has taught me to find inspiration in everything, and that is certainly something I don’t take for granted.

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2 Comments

    1. Thank you for your kind words, Donné!

      I’ve actually just been using the camera on my Samsung Galaxy S7 phone. I don’t use any of the special settings or anything (that’s a bit too technological for me!). However, I have just purchased a Canon EOS 1300D. Future blog posts should be shot using this camera, which is better than the Samsung.

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