26 Grains: the London Café Bringing Back Porridge

Hello, my name is Dani, and I am a porridge addict.

My morning is not complete until I’ve devoured soy milk porridge with sultanas, raspberries, and a drizzle of honey. Some people have yoga, some people have meditation – and I have my porridge. It’s calming to stand over the stove stirring the oats and contemplating my day, and I don’t see myself adopting another breakfast choice anytime soon.

When I was organising a day trip to London, I was ecstatic to discover that there is a porridge café there. Yes, you heard right: a porridge café. Much to my boyfriend’s inconvenience, I planned the whole day around visiting to this café, and I must say, I was not disappointed.

Photograph courtesy of Time Out

Tucked away in the whimsical little courtyard of Neal’s Yard is 26 Grains.

Porridge isn’t exactly what you might call a fashionable food, but 26 Grains – founded by Alex Hely-Hutchinson – is helping it make a comeback. Perhaps what I like best about 26 Grains – aside from the porridge, that is – is that the café really captures that Scandinavian atmosphere of cosiness. It’s exactly what you need first thing on a London morning; in fact, I would go as far as to describe my experience there as though my stomach had been cradled in a warm, delicious hug.

Photograph courtesy of 26 Grains

I’m reluctant to call 26 Grains a minimalist café, but they certainly illustrate the philosophy of ‘less is more’. The only form of clutter is a selection of cookbooks dotted around the place, and a plant wall on the garage doors. As far as customers go, some are bent low over their morning newspaper, steam from their cappuccino curling into the air. Two sit opposite one another, heads together in hushed chatter over a bowl of banana cacao, on what might even be a first date.

“Nothing in this world is as it seems. Except, possibly, porridge.”

Stephen Fry

Photograph courtesy of Amazon

The one drawback to our experience was the café’s insane popularity. This meant that our only option for dining was to be seated up at the bar, which wasn’t the most comfortable and relaxed setup. In saying that, we were lucky to even get this option, and it did give us full view of the kitchen. We also had the choice of dining al fresco, but considering we were visiting the capital in late December, that alternative wasn’t wildly appetising.

Photograph courtesy of Retail Design Blog

26 Grains really nails the craft of artisan porridge. To cite their menu, we’re talking about Nordic pear porridge with coconut yoghurt and cacao crumble… rhubarb and cardamon granola with compote… even their famous avocado and dukkah on sourdough rye for those who decide that porridge isn’t their thing. While you’re there, why not energise with a turmeric latte or smoothie? You can check out their affordable, healthy and seasonal menu here. Oh, and p.s. – they’re vegan friendly 🐮

“26 is just a number that I like… it’s one of those numbers that seems to come around a lot; there are 26 letters in the alphabet, 26 miles in a marathon, 260 weekdays in a year, it just fits.”

Alex Hely-Hutchinson in an interview with Suitcase Magazine

Photographs courtesy of About Time, Healthy Hotspots and Pixie 

About five minutes after we had ordered, we were served with beautifully-presented porridge; a feature which is very important in the day and age of social media where nothing really happens unless you Instagram it. Served in quaint ceramic bowls, I drooled over the dish that was too beautiful to eat. Then – if it were even possible – I discovered that it tasted even better than it looked.

The Ginger’s Recommendation

  • Hazelnut and Butter Porridge with Almond Milk Oats, Cinnamon Coconut Palm Sugar and Apple
  • Fresh Mint and Ginger Tea

26 Grains isn’t just for the porridge lovers; photograph courtesy of Pinterest

If you are planning a trip to London, I strongly recommend you make time to visit this café. 26 Grains really makes you appreciate the simple things in life. Now, excuse me whilst I book another trip to London to feed my porridge addiction.

The ‘Deats

Name: 26 Grains

Website: Here (seriously, you should check it out)

Location: 1 Neal’s Yard, London, WC2H 9DP

Hours: Monday to Friday (8am-5pm) and Saturday to Sunday (10am-4pm)

To bring the oat-y magic to your kitchen, check out the 26 Grains Cookbook on Amazon. Furthermore, to read more café reviews on the Ginger Passports, allow me to introduce you to Brew-tiful: Nectar Espresso Bar and Café, and my personal favourite, Starfish Café: Your Sunday Morning Fix.

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5 Things You Need to Do When Sick on the Road

When I arrived in Cairo for three weeks in September, my view for the first five days was the toilet bowel. A particularly evil bout of flu had descended upon my immune system, and the very first thing I ate in the country – vegetarian pizza, if you’re interested – invoked an unpleasant case of food poisoning that manifested from both ends. For five days, fever, diarrhoea, vomiting, and a whole lot of snot were my introduction to Egypt. Charming, I know.

When you travel, sickness is an inevitability. It doesn’t matter if you’re traveling to Iceland or India; exposure to foreign viruses and bacteria that you body may not have developed resistance to are enough to bring even the healthiest to their knees. Furthermore, it is all but impossible to travel without navigating dreaded public transport systems, and those environments are an orgy for bugs.

The prospect of falling ill can be especially frightening if you are embarking on a holiday with a very time-dependent itinerary. Fortunately for me, that wasn’t the case in Egypt. However, I have been in that situation before (shout out to bronchitis in Cambodia), and understand that it is very stressful and calls for some quick decision-making with financial consequences. That stress is only amplified if it is your first time solo traveling without ‘adult’ authority. Trust me, we’ve all been there.

Although I like to think I am a reasonably healthy person, I fail to remember a single trip where I have not suffered from illness at some point or another. So – for all you panicking sick folk out there – here is my advice for what you should do if you fall sick on the road…

Should I say it a little louder for those in the back? Buy. Travel. Insurance.

Okay, so this tidbit is more preventative that reactive. But nevertheless – invest in a decent travel insurance plan! When I left New Zealand, I spent over NZ$800 on a one year comprehensive travel insurance plan. This covered medical expenses, baggage, personal liability – you name it. At the time, I was kicking myself. Why on earth did I pay nearly one thousand dollars for something that I wasn’t guaranteed to need?! But lo and behold, I had claimed for more than what I originally paid in those first three months.

As long as what you are suffering from is not a pre-existing condition, you will be able to be compensated. That means that you should never be in a position where you are unwilling to see a doctor or buy medication overseas because you hadn’t factored the extra expense into your budget. Furthermore, the worse case scenario is no longer fraught by such financial consequences. To conclude, travel insurance is never a bad idea.

When I was in Cambodia, I woke up one morning to find that my throat had fallen victim to acute bronchitis. It was during the last two days of a month-long tour of Southeast Asia, on the home run returning to New Zealand. I couldn’t eat for the pain, and every few minutes, I would stumble towards the bathroom and hack up snotballs. Unlike my Egyptian anecdote, I had a whole two days of full itineraries ahead of me, and the prospect of soldiering on in such misery made me want to curl up in bed and cry.

As it happens, that’s just what I did.

Well, I didn’t cry, but I curled up in bed and didn’t leave the hotel room for 48 hours. Whilst it certainly wasn’t easy having to ring up our tour guides and cancel everything last minute, my body thanked me for the sacrifice when I managed to make the flight home under slightly more bearable circumstances.

Sleep is one of your leading weapons when facing illness, as it helps rebuild your immune system and fight infections. It is really important that you listen to your body during times like these, and catch the sleep you need when you need it. Even if it means having to cancel day trips and outings like I did in Cambodia, you will enjoy the rest of your trip to a much greater degree.

Another reason you should stay in bed is that it reduces the likelihood of other people getting sick. One of my biggest pet peeves is when people who are clearly ill insist on going about their day like nothing is at stake. I get it – there are situations where you simply cannot afford to miss something. But there are also plenty of others where you are doing yourself and everyone else a favour by staying in bed. Rampart bugs relating to travel can be particularly contagious, and if one person in the group falls ill, there’s a good chance others will too.

This doesn’t really apply to countries like England or the United States, but if your travels take you to slightly less developed places (for lack of a better term), then listen up.

Drinking tap water is a big no no in less developed corners of the world as microorganisms in the water can make you very sick. It may do no harm to the locals, but that is because their systems are familiar with the bacteria, and you should not follow suit. Bottled water isn’t a huge expense, and you’ll find crates of the stuff at corner shops on every street. Bear in mind that this rule also applies to things such as brushing your teeth and rinsed foods; this blog post is a really neat resource for everything you need to know about safe and unsafe drinking water when traveling.

On the health front, drinking plenty of water when you’re feeling under the weather is a must. Symptoms – such as vomiting and diarrhoea – dehydrate the body, and make you feel much, much worse. It’s also important to drink lots of water to ward off high temperatures.

The last thing you will want to eat after an intense pukefest is some extravagant, spicy, cultural dish. To be honest, you probably won’t want to eat anything; but alas, your body needs nutrients and energy to do it’s thing.

The key here is to try and find a balance of bland, ‘easy’ foods that you can stomach, whilst still being relatively healthy. My personal go to’s are apples and dry toast, but I have also heard that papaya, yoghurt and chicken soup are also good alternatives (but hey, as a vegetarian, I’m not exactly preaching the latter).

Last but not least, do not shy away from contacting a doctor. Sometimes when you’re on the road, and away from the comfort and familiarity of home routine, paying a visit to a doctor can seem downright out of place.  But the good news is that wherever you venture, there will always be a medical professional there to help you. Sure, there might be an extra cost – but you’ve got travel insurance, right? 😉

If you are staying in a hotel, most will have a service where a doctor will pay a house call. If you are worried or in a lot of pain, don’t be afraid to use this service. Even if you’re in a foreign country, there are almost always medical services catering to English-speaking tourists; and if you’re reading this blog, the chances are, you speak English.

The major advantage to consulting a doctor abroad is that you can find out exactly what is wrong with you, and how to deal with it. You will likely receive a prescription for medicine that you cannot access over the counter, and your recovery time will be shortened. When I fell ill in Cambodia, a doctor visited my hotel room, quickly conducted a series of blood tests, and then returned an hour later with a full sheet of results and recommended treatments. It was convenient, to say the least.

Travel is challenging enough when you’re feeling fit. Becoming sick when you’re outside of your comfort zone can push you to the limit, but it doesn’t have to be such a nuisance to sort out. The main thing you need to remember is to buy travel insurance before you depart; that way, regardless of what happens, there should be no barriers to treatment and recovery. Once that’s taken care of, the rest is downhill, no matter what the world throws at you.

For more travel advice, check out the following blog posts on the Ginger Passports…

Photographs courtesy of Unsplash

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2017 Travel Recap: One Year in Three Minutes

… better late than never, right? 🙈

One day, I will publish content on time. Today is not that day.

Nevertheless, I have finally gotten around to writing a blog post to accompany my 2017 Travel Recap video that I published to YouTube about three weeks ago. As I wrote, sometimes it takes editing on your laptop for fifteen hours straight to really appreciate the magnitude of the year you’ve just had. In the space of 2 minutes and 52 seconds, I cram my adventures from five diverse yet equally incredible countries into this yearly review.

There’s the pyramids in Egypt. The nature in New Zealand. The architecture in Spain. The Mediterranean beaches in France.

Oh, and a cute ‘lil cat café from England (gotta have variety, right?).

So, without further ado, take a look…

If written posts are more your cup of tea, be sure to check out the other half of my yearly review – 2017 Blogging Recap: Running Away From My Problems – for all the honesty and behind the scenes ‘deats. Also, pop on over to the Ginger Passports’ YouTube Channel and show some love by subscribing or giving me a much appreciated thumbs up 👍

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Hamsa Mansour: The Egyptian Cyclist Showing How it’s Done

Twenty nine-year-old Hamsa Mansour is many things: athlete, adventurer, aspiring documentarian and storyteller – and come 2019, she might just be the first Egyptian woman to solo cycle the entirety of Egypt.

I first stumbled upon Hamsa’s story in an article published on the independent news organisation Egyptian Streets. Here was an inspiring women with a passion for travel and challenging preconceptions about what is and isn’t possible – how could I turn down the opportunity to share her story?

On the 23rd of December 2017, Hamsa completed an 8-day solo, unsupported cycle from the capital city of Cairo and across the Sinai Peninsula; a journey that served as preparation for her 2019 goal. For this challenge, Hamsa was sponsored by Wild Guanabana and supported by her husband Nour El Din, and one of her best friends, Galal Zekri Chatila – both whom have solo cycled Egypt before. Nour and Galal provided pre-trip consultations and were Hamsa’s emergency contacts throughout the duration of the trip. Additionally, a wider support network based in different locations around the country tracked her progress and safety. In the final days of 2017, I was fortunate enough to catch up with Hamsa on cycling, Egypt, and why being a girl should never stop anyone.

You recently completed cycling around the Red Sea and Sinai. Can you tell us a little bit about your experience?

The journey was overwhelming. Let me start by saying that I had to stop at Nuweiba (70km and one day away from the planned end destination) because of an injury. I was advised by a doctor to turn around and take a bus home on the fourth day, but I was sure I could push some more, and I wanted to reach the farthest I could.

The journey to Nuweiba was really overwhelming. Being on my own on the roads I truly love and feeling that I’m at home was new to me, (and) being challenged every single day and breaking down and getting myself back up made me more resilient. The first 3 days were very hard; I was facing unpredicted head winds at great speeds that slowed me down a lot, and my speed averaged at 9-10km/hr instead of 17-19 km/hr. It was demotivating and devastating to not have been able to reach my original destination on the second day, and having to make adjustments because of the wind. I had to take everything in a joking manner. I would sit on the road and laugh at the fact that I’m cycling at 8km/hr, and that I’d been cycling for five hours to cover thirty-something kilometres. It was my way of dealing with it. It was an “I’ll get there when I get there” sort of mentality. I learned a lot about respecting my body. I learnt that it isn’t a machine, (that) it will get tired and it is entitled to.

You had to amend your original plans to manage injury. Is psychological flexibility something that comes naturally to you?

I actually had to amend a lot of things on this trip – before your question, I didn’t even know that it required psychological flexibility!

Changing plans according to the circumstances doesn’t bother or worry me. On the first day, I had to accept that my speedometer wasn’t working and wouldn’t work and (that there was) head wind. I had to change the plans and destinations because of this several times, (and) then I had to change my plans because of the injuries. This started with completely ditching the planning and going as fast as my body would allow me, to not cycling the last day and ending the journey in Nuweiba. I do better when I’m not tied to schedules and deadlines. It gives me space to breathe.

What is your response to people who tell you that you’re pursuing the impossible by training to be the first Egyptian woman to solo cycle around Egypt?

I don’t believe in impossible things. I would just say that I have been told that the trip I just finished is impossible and that I will end up raped and dead on the side of the road and here I am, I think the first Egyptian woman to solo cycle such a distance inside Egypt unsupported.

“(When) I started planning this trip alone, 99% of the reactions I received were along the lines of, ‘Girls don’t do this alone, someone will kidnap and rape you and you will be found dead’. I didn’t believe this to be true and it made me want to embark on this adventure the soonest to prove that people are inherently good.”
Source

How has living your whole life in Egypt informed your attitude towards gender?

There has always been a contrast between the way I was raised and how the society functions. At home, I was never ever introduced to the concept of saying ‘the difference between men and women isn’t right’. I didn’t know that some people saw it this way to begin with, so I never thought of that. My mom raised us as all kids should be raised. Being a girl was just a fact, not an issue. As I grew older and I saw how the society functions, I didn’t understand or conform to it, (and) it was never a part of any decision-making. It is way more simple to me than this, and I believe (it is) what makes me not scared while venturing on such adventures.

What is a message you have for anyone considering traveling to Egypt for the first time?  

Forget the stereotypes and the places they tell you to visit. This country is very, very diverse; we have several cultures and ethnic communities that you would love to discover and understand. Instead of going to Cairo and Alexandria, go to Siwa and the western desert and its marvellous sand dunes. Go to Sinai and enjoy hiking the deserts and climbing mountains for days at a time. Go to Aswan and see the colourful islands on the Nile banks, and stay with Nubian people in their homes. Go to Luxor and see pharaonic wonders. There is much, much more.

You have said that you weren’t always the strong, adventurous person you are now. If you could go back in time, what would you tell your younger self in light of everything you have achieved today?

I would tell myself to get up and get stronger. I would tell myself that it is worth it.

How can we support you on your journey towards your 2019 goal?

I want to raise awareness towards (my) journey. I will honestly need sponsors to be able to (achieve) this, and I need more people to know about it. I have been receiving messages that what I did inspired some – if that is true, I would love more people to hear about it.

“I do believe it’s always mind over matter. In any single adventure, in anything we do. It’s what gets you up a mountain; it’s not only your training, but what you think, and how you talk to yourself.”
Source

Follow Hamsa on Instagram to keep up to date with her adventures…
… and check out Wild Guanabana, the sponsor of Hamsa’s cycling!

 

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