The Ginger’s Guide to New Zealand Coffee (WTF is a Long Black?!)

“It doesn’t matter where you’re from, or how you feel… there’s always peace in a strong cup of coffee.”
Gabriel Bá

Consistent with my tendency as a Kiwi to regard my country with vague deprecation, I never considered New Zealand to have a noteworthy coffee culture. But from the moment I walked into a Spanish café and tried to order a mochaccino, I realised I had well undermined our efforts.

If you’re not from down under and have ever found yourself in a New Zealand cafe, you’ve probably found yourself wondering: what on earth is a long black? Is that the opposite of a flat white? Is a fluffy even a thing?

If so, you’re not alone. Overseas, drinks such as Americanos, viennas and ristrettos dominate the cafés. Much like Australia, New Zealand does it’s own thing when it comes to coffee. So without further ado, here is a crash course on how to order a coffee in the land of the long white cloud…

Long Black

A long black is the most basic kind of coffee you can order in a Kiwi’s eyes. It’s basically two shots of espresso in hot water – very similar to the Americano (which you are unlikely to find advertised here). Long blacks are very strong, and not for the faint of heart.

Flat White

A Kiwi/Aussie creation – and my personal favourite – the flat white has creamy, steamed milk poured over a single shot of espresso. If you ask me, it’s a bit kinder than the long black first thing in the morning.

Latte

Although I have deep affection for coffee, I would by no means consider myself a connoisseur. And that is why I can say that I don’t really see the difference between a latte and a flat white. Apparently the only difference is that a latte has a little blanket of foam on the top, but essentially, it’s the same drink.

Cappuccino

Although the cappuccino is traditionally Italian, it is also very popular in New Zealand. The easiest way to conceptualise a cappuccino is as comprising of three different layers; the bottom layer is a shot of espresso, the middle layer is a shot of steamed milk, and the final layer is frothed milk. It is also common to sprinkle chocolate or cinnamon shavings over the top 😋

Mochaccino

Here, we return to the rule of thirds as with the cappuccino. This time, we have a third of espresso, a third of steamed milk, and a third of cocoa. A mochaccino is a convenient way to develop an appreciation for coffee without jumping in the deep end and scaring your tastebuds. I mean, let’s be realistic; it’s just a bitter hot chocolate.

Macchiato

Yeah… I still don’t really understand the difference between a macchiato and a long black (except for the fact that a macchiato sounds pretty damn fancy). From what I’ve gathered, a macchiato is ‘stained’ with frothed milk.

Fluffy

We can’t forget the fluffy! A fluffy is essentially a minuscule cup of foamed milk. I loved them when I was a little girl. They’re what small children get from cafés to feel adult-y and sophisticated when their caregiver stops off for a caffeine hit. If you’re lucky, they might come with a marshmallow or chocolate fish on the side.

If you’re a long-time reader of the Ginger Passports, you might remember that I published a post way back in March called You Can’t Buy Happiness… But You Can Buy Vietnamese Coffee. To this day, this remains one of my favourite all-time posts, and I highly recommend that you check it out to learn just what makes Vietnamese coffee special, and to discover a life-changing iced coffee recipe.

Alternatively, you might like to read some reviews I wrote about two of my favourite coffee haunts in my home town of Dunedin. The first is for Starfish Café and Bar, a seaside joint that I used to hit up on a near-daily basis when I was back in the motherland. The second is Nectar Espresso Bar and Café, which is slightly more urban and located closer to the middle of town.

P.S. I apologise on behalf of all Kiwis for the price of our coffee 🙈

All photographs courtesy of Unsplash.

Let’s Get Social!

Facebook ● Twitter ● Youtube

And don’t forget to subscribe to our email newsletter!

sign off

social media

links to other posts (Vietnam + two cafes)

slider

Continue Reading

The French Way: A Succulent Food Tour of Nice + Recipe

It was mid-morning when my family and I shuffled sleepily to Place Masséna on a Sunday in mid August. Our arrival to Nice the previous evening had offered us a peek into the lazy, sun-kissed life of the Côte d’Azur, and we were ready to explore the city through our tastebuds.

At 9.30am on the dot, our lovely tour guide, Marion, bounded into the square. We had booked a food tour with the French Way, a local company specialising in art, food and wine tours in Nice and Paris. The rest of my family were proud foodies, and whilst I was still developing an appreciation for gastronomy, I was excited to tease my palate with the iconic tastes of Niçoise food.

While I’d always thought of French food as confined to croissants and vintage cheese I can’t pronounce, this tour would open my eyes to the fresh and simplistic flavours of the French Riviera. Described by the French Way as, “not quite French, not quite Italian”, French cuisine is characterised by the use of locally-grown vegetables that are chosen according to the season. The dishes focus on modest, reductionist ingredients so that the consumer can enjoy each component in its own right.

Marion lead our tour group from Place Masséna, through the Old Town and to Cours Saleya Market. There, we wandered through the bustling stalls with eyes as wide as a child’s on Christmas morning, trying to take in everything all at once. The colours, the smells, the atmosphere… it was almost too much to process. All the while, Marion was throwing information and samples at us left, right and centre.

Highlights included Torta de Blea (a local cake made of sweet and savoury ingredients), Socca (a chickpea pancake of sorts), and hard candies made from violet flowers. Oh, and I can’t forget all that gorgeous fresh fruit.

Fifteen tastings later (yes, you read that right), and we had arrived at Maison Bremond 1830. Maison Bremond 1830 is a mouth-watering shop specialising in olive oils, truffles, tapenades, terrines and confectionery, all sourced from the Mediterranean and Provence. There, we were treated to olive and truffle oils that would change my standards of cooking forever. Without a shred of doubt, my favourite was the lemon-infused olive oil. I thought that was quite impressive for someone who doesn’t particularly like lemons or olives 🍋

The ‘Deats

Name: Maison Bremond 1830

Website: Here

Address: 15 Rue de Pont Vieux

Phone: +33 (0)4 93 92 50 40

Email: nice@maison-bremond.com

At the end of the tour, we bode farewell to Marion and retreated back to our apartment with full stomachs and inspired minds. As someone who had never been passionate about the kitchen (I think to even say I am tolerant is quite a stretch), I was amused to find myself motivated to practice recipes and dishes influenced by Niçoise cuisine. I really relish the idea of modest, delicious food that is easy on the tastebuds and easy on the waistline. I guess that’s the key word here: easy. None of the meals Marion delighted in showing us required much preparation or effort, and they were all sourced from local producers without any of that synthetic shit imposed through processes of importation or preservation. With French food, what you see is what you get. It doesn’t get much better than that.

Recipe

Salade Niçoise

2 hands full of red radishes

4 hard-boiled eggs

1 branch of celery

2 handfuls of cherry tomatoes

200g of tinned tuna

4 big handfuls of mixed salad leaves

1 tablespoon of dijon mustard

10 tablespoons of olive oil

3 tablespoons of red wine vinegar

1/2 red pepper and 1/2 yellow pepper

4 spring onions (or 1/2 red onion)

1 handful of broad beans

4 purple artichokes

16 tinned salted anchovies

black olives de Nice

salt and pepper

vinaigrette

The ‘Deats

Name: The French Way

Website   Facebook   Twitter   TripAdvisor

Address: 31 Avenue Malaussena

Phone: +33 (0) 6 27 35 13 75

Email: info@thefrenchway.fr

If this article has whetted your appetite for all things French, then make sure you take the time to enjoy my two Parisian blog posts: Fluctuat Ner Mergitur: A Paris Photo Diary and How to Spend a Layover in Paris (Sans Eiffel Tower) 🇫🇷

Let’s Get Social!

Facebook ● Twitter ● Youtube ● Bloglovin’

And don’t forget to subscribe to our monthly email newsletter!

Continue Reading

Brew-tiful: Nectar Espresso Bar & Café

“As long as there was coffee in the world, how bad could things be?”

Cassandra Clare

It’s been a while since I reviewed a café. You might remember my blog post on Starfish from way back in January, where I discussed the thriving café culture in the New Zealand city of Dunedin. I was determined to bust the camera out at least once more before buying that one way ticket out of here, and my nose led me to Nectar.

I don’t consider myself a coffee maestro, but in saying that, I know a good cup of joe when I see (…drink?) one. Nectar Espresso Bar and Café specialises in brewing high quality coffee roasted right here in Middle Earth. The barista also scores brownie points for going out of their way to concoct an iced coffee for me that didn’t pre-exist on their menu – and they served it in a mason jar. It made all my hipster dreams come true.

The Nectar philosophy towards food is free-range, gourmet and delicious. They also cater to vegetarians, gluten free-ers… you name it. They’re also open to special requests and will go out of their way to accommodate your wants and needs. Oh, and did I mention the presentation of the food is insane?! Honestly, I feel like I’m dining in some five star Parisian restaurant. It’s pretty awesome considering the menu here won’t break your budget.

Nectar offers a warm and inviting environment that embraces you like a warm hug – especially during the depths of winter. A make or break feature for me when it comes to cafés are their design. It doesn’t matter how divine the food is; if the aesthetic doesn’t tell a story, I’m not convinced. Fortunately, Nectar passes this test with flying colours. A palette of white, yellow and green sweeps through the interior, and the rich motif of plants keep things fresh and natural.

This is a sublime place to celebrate special occasions. For a more industrial Tuscan atmosphere, venture out onto the landing at the top of the steps. There is also a sun-drenched bench at the front of the café decked out with the latest newspapers and magazines. As Nectar is located in the business district, I always see workers pop in for a morning caffeine hit or lunch break and enjoy their takeaway coffee upon the stools, taking in the sights of the bustling street outside.

My Nectar Brunch Order

  • Iced Coffee
  • Poached Free Range Eggs w/ Mushrooms, Grilled Vine Tomato and House-Made Hash-Browns
  • Birdseed Slice

Tip: Ask for your iced coffee with ice cubes sans cream. I’ve found that different countries take very different approaches to this cold beverage, and – if your taste buds are anything like mine – that is either a very good thing or a very, very bad thing. In New Zealand, an iced coffee is more like a Starbucks-esque frappuccino than, y’know, a coffee with ice. It always pays to take the time to clarify what you are actually ordering with your barista to avoid disappointment.

The ‘Deats

Name: Nectar Espresso Bar and Café

Websitewww.nectarespresso.co.nz

Facebook: @nectarespresso

Location: 286 Princes Street, Dunedin, New Zealand

Phone: 03 477 8976

Hours: 8am – 3pm

If you are a coffee enthusiast like me, then be sure to check out my blog post: You Can’t Buy Happiness… But You Can Buy Vietnamese Coffee ☕

Let’s Get Social!

Facebook ● Twitter ● Youtube ● Bloglovin’

And don’t forget to subscribe to our weekly email newsletter!

Continue Reading

How to Fall in Love with Cromwell (In 5 Easy Steps)

Step One: Take a Step Back in Time…

Cromwell – located deep in the heart of Central Otago – pays tribute to its rich heritage with a precinct called Old Cromwell Town. Here, you’ll find art galleries, cafés and boutique shops all operating out of authentic historic buildings. The heritage precinct – also known as “Central Otago’s best kept secret” – overlooks the stunning Lake Dunstan and hosts the Cromwell Farmer’s Market (catch it every Sunday from 9am-1pm over the warmer months).

Step Two: Save Water, Drink Wine

“One should always be drunk. That’s all that matters… but with what? With wine, with poetry, or with virtue, as you choose. But get drunk.” – Charles Baudelaire

I like to think of Cromwell as the Barossa Valley of New Zealand. It may not be as vast nor as renowned, but does that really matter as far as excellent wine is concerned?

Cromwell is celebrated for it’s orchards and it’s not hard to see why; a patchwork of vineyards cloak the bountiful landscape, and the view is almost as sweet as the taste. My winery loyalties are divided between Mt Difficulty and Scott Base. You’ll find the former perched above Bannockburn whilst the latter is a short walk from ‘the fruit’ (as seen in Step 5).

Step Three: Fall for Cromwell

Hehe – geddit? Fall? Well, you Americans may have caught my embarrassing pun, but us Kiwis might need a ‘lil helping hand.

The best time to visit Cromwell is in autumn. Between the months of March – May, you may miss cooking like a baked potato in the summer heat, but you will be treated to a rustic palette of nutmeg leaves and amber dusks. My favourite time of the day is late afternoon when the sky blushes, the sun sinks low upon the horizon and you would be forgiven for mistaking the mountains to have caught fire.

Step Four: 5 a Day Keeps the Doctor Away

(Okay, so there’s only 4 here, but you catch the gist.)

There is perhaps nothing more iconic about Cromwell than the enormous painted fruit sculpture on the main road. The gigantic pear, apple, orange and – I think nectarine? – welcome you into the town that is famed for it’s abundance of orchards. You haven’t had the full Central Otago experience until you’ve gone cherry picking at Cheeki Cherries, or demolished a blueberry real-fruit ice cream from Freeway Orchard.

Step Five: Say Cheese!

Cheese is one of the best goddamn things on earth and you cannot convince me otherwise.

Nothing goes better with a good old glass of pinot noir than a slab of gorgonzola, and what better place to enjoy a succulent cheese platter than Cromwell? The beauty featured below is from Scott Base Vineyards, which I enjoyed one balmy evening preceding my reluctant journey home.

If you’re keen to see some more of what Cromwell has to offer in action, then check out my Central Otago Travel Vlog – and don’t forget to show the love and subscribe to the Ginger Passport’s YouTube Channel!

Let’s Get Social!

Facebook ● Twitter ● Youtube ● Bloglovin’

And don’t forget to subscribe to our weekly email newsletter!

Continue Reading

You Can’t Buy Happiness… But You Can Buy Vietnamese Coffee

(verb.) to delay or postpone action; put off doing something until you’ve had coffee.

As a third-year university student, I think that it is fair to say that coffee is my best friend. In saying that though, my love affair with coffee did not fully begin until I travelled to Vietnam in late 2016. I had experimented with caffeine early in the year as part of am attempt to demonstrate my transition into official adulthood, but had conceded defeat after I realised that drinking coffee was like drinking burnt charcoal. Nevertheless, it was impossible to travel around Vietnam – one of the coffee hotspots of the world – without trying the stuff.

Whilst coffee was only introduced to Vietnam in 1857 by the French, it has become one of the country’s biggest exports. In fact, Vietnam is the second-largest producer of coffee in the world! Didn’t expect that from a wee nation tucked away in Southeast Asia, did you? If you’re interested in learning more about how Vietnam transformed into one of the globe’s leading coffee giants, you might be inclined to check out this BBC article.

Vietnamese coffee is prepared by coarsely grinding Robusta beans through a French drip filter known as a phin. While the beans are weighted down, hot water is added and slowly trickles down through the phin into the cup. Voila! It’s as simple as that.

Whilst I do not consider myself a caffeine expert by any means, I do enjoy a bit of good old fashioned research, and the consensus is clear: Vietnamese coffee is some of the best coffee in the world. What makes Vietnamese coffee — or ca phe, as it is called — so iconic is its incorporation of sweetened condensed milk. Think think and dreamy with “notes of nuttiness” to throw your tastebuds into a stimulated frenzy. I’m not going to lie; condensed milk certainly provides a helpful hand for developing an appreciation for coffee for those who are put off by the traditional bitter taste. This is especially convenient in this case, as the Vietnamese like their coffee strong.

One of the reasons I decided to visit Vietnam — or Southeast Asia in general — was the low cost of travel there. Consistent with this, you will not find yourself emptying your pockets to purchase a cup of joe. Depending on the quality of the Robusta beans and the overall price of the venue, you’ll probably find yourself forking out between 20,000 – 70,000 Vietnamese dong for a glass. This roughly approximates to NZD$1.25 – $4.40 (or USD$0.90 – $3.00).

How to Make Vietnamese-Style Iced Coffee

Ingredients

22g of finely ground medium-dark coffee

140ml of hot water

30ml of sweetened condensed milk

100g of ice (crushed or cubed)

Method

1. Pour the condensed milk into a glass to line the base of the cup

2. Load a stainless steel phin with the coffee grounds

3. Place the coffee-laden phin on top of the glass

4. Wet the coffee in the filter with 20 ml of hot water

5. Pour another 120ml of hot water over the coffee grounds

6. Wait approximately 8-10 minutes until all of the water has drained through

5. Mix the coffee with condensed milk and enjoy!

Which country do you think produces the best coffee? Share your thoughts, and I’ll be sure to put it up to the taste test when I travel there! Furthermore, if you are intrigued by the different foods and drinks cultures have to offer, you might want to check out my blog post on 5 Foods That Will Make You Go WTF (and 5 Foods That Won’t) 👌

All photos sourced from unplash.com

Let’s Get Social!

Facebook ● Instagram ● Youtube ● Bloglovin’

And don’t forget to subscribe to our weekly email newsletter!

Continue Reading

5 Foods That Will Make You Go WTF (and 5 Foods That Wont)

Oh, Thailand.

One of the highlights of traveling to a faraway and exotic country is having the opportunity to try weird and wonderful foods. In France, that may be escargots. In South America, that may be roast guinea pig. In Thailand… well, let’s just say you’ve come to the right place to find out.

1

Insects

20161117_201755-1

Traveling to Southeast Asia as a vegetarian, the last thing I expected myself to do was eat a bug. But, as it would stand, I am not very good at being vegetarian.

Feeling a little bit like a contestant off Fear Factor, I decided to expand my palate on the very first night of the trip by having a nibble of a grasshopper. In Thailand, insects are fried in a wok, seasoned with chilli, salt and pepper, and enjoyed as snacks. Whilst I cast my doubts on the Thai people’s relationship with the word ‘enjoyed’, I will admit that it wasn’t the absolute worst thing I have ever eaten. Did it taste like bitter, burnt popcorn? Maybe. Did it require me to run to the kitchen and spit out the remnants immediately afterwards? Maybe. But rest assured, it looks more gross than it actually is.

2

Fried Chicken Heads

20161120_105753-1

When I passed these at the market, I actually had to do a double take. I’d heard of chicken feet being a delicacy, but chicken heads? I felt a little sick just looking at them.

Whilst our tour guide informed us that these are mostly used for the purposes of pet food, that doesn’t stop people (including a few questionably brave tourists) from indulging themselves. Apparently (because, y’know, there was no way I was trying these in a hurry) they consist almost entirely of bones and gristle with a little bit of fat in the neck. If these little guys whet your appetite, don’t forget to crack the head so that you don’t miss out on the “unique buttery flavour” of the brain.

I think I’ll pass.

3

Whole Fish

20161120_105356-1

Arguably this isn’t as crazy as the other foods listed, but hailing from somewhere like New Zealand, it’s still a shock to see an entire fish for sale – head and all – as opposed to cuts of meat.

What really took me aback was the price. One of these fish were worth 30 baht (the Thai currency) which is roughly equivalent to USD$0.80!

4

Fried Worms

20161120_105259-1

20161120_110459-1
Poppy enjoying her fried worms.

Mmm.

Fried bamboo worms are a Thai treat that you will most likely find in the North.

My friend Poppy and I brought a small bag of ‘lesser’ worms (because apparently you have high and low quality fried worms… who would’ve known?), and I plucked up the courage to try one.

In all honesty, I preferred the grasshopper. These little rascals tasted like gravel with a vaguely peanut-esque aftertaste. “Just like popcorn!” our guide grinned.

Yeah right.

5

Whole Fish 2.0

20161206_123536-1

20161206_123548-1

If you thought I was done with the fish, then you were wrong.

I have no idea what kind of fish this was, but I’m sure it was an ugly mother******. This entire fish – teeth and all – was placed on the table in front of us, complete with chopsticks and dipping sauce. Had I not been vegetarian, I don’t think I could have even eaten anything, what with it staring back at you. If you fancy watching Poppy’s ethical dilemma, check out our travel vlog.

1

Ice Cream

20161118_130353-1

The first thing I decided when I arrived in Thailand was that I would have put on 5kg worth of dessert by the time I returned home. How can you not when you’re constantly walking past places like this?!

Aside from the miscellany of ice cream flavours, the toppings alone are to die for. Toasted marshmallow? Buttered popcorn? Oreo crush? Froot loops? You name it – they’ve got it.

2

Street Food

20161117_183318-1

You cannot travel to Thailand and not try the street food. Aside from the fact that it’s so insanely cheap, it also tastes infinitely better than anything you would ever buy out of a package. Plus, you’ll find yourself eyeing up foods you never even knew existed.

Durian? I have no idea what that is, but I’ll take three.

3

Watermelon Juice

20161120_105728-1

You got me; this isn’t a photo of watermelon juice. But it is a photo of fresh watermelon (and some sneaky papayas) at a local Thai market, which I think we can all agree is far more photogenic than juice in a cup.

Watermelon is one of my favourite fruits, and the only thing better than fruit is liquid fruit. The beauty of watermelon juice in Thailand is that – like everything – it is so much cheaper than the same product would cost back home (or even in neighbouring countries, for that matter). An average watermelon juice in Thailand might cost around USD$0.60. To put that into perspective, when I ordered one during my stopover in Singapore on the way home, I was charged USD$5.60. Case in point.

4

Gelato

20161128_210642-1

I tend to think of Italy when I think of gelato, but that doesn’t mean the Thai don’t know how to do their frozen desserts.

I became obsessed with matcha green tea gelato during my stay. The taste is ultra refreshing and perfect for a snack on the go during a hot, sticky day tour in the sun. One of those crispy waffle cones don’t go amiss, either.

5

Dragonfruit

20161120_110024-1

I think the name of this fruit alone is enough to warrant a mention.

If you don’t think you’re familiar with these, then you might be able to jog your memory by scrolling through any Instagram tag along the lines of #smoothiebowl or #nalubowl. Dragonfruit are white on the inside with distinctive black seeds dotted throughout them. They taste somewhat like a less tangy kiwifruit, and are popular for their gorgeous colours.

What weird and wonderful foods have you encountered on your overseas travels? Comment below – I’d love to hear about your experience!

Let’s Get Social!

Facebook ● Instagram ● Youtube ● Bloglovin’

And don’t forget to subscribe to our weekly email newsletter!

Continue Reading

Starfish Café: Your Sunday Morning Fix

Could this possibly be the best café in Dunedin?

14971456_1186872748064332_2121762987_o

Having lived in this city in southern New Zealand my whole life, I think it is fair to say that I have done the café rounds. Coming from a family with a passion for food (and being a high-functioning teaholic), it is hard pressed for me to find a café here that I have not dined at.

And so we arrive at the Starfish, the eclectic seaside café on the St. Clair esplanade.

15033894_1186872954730978_1478926316_o

It’s hard to define Starfish, but maybe that’s the beauty of it. From the electric swing playing over the speakers to the David Bowie posters pouting down at you from the wall, from the vintage swan wallpaper to the Pacific Ocean right outside the front door… and I haven’t even gotten to the food yet. Think coconut turmeric lattes as you sit outside and enjoy the sun on a lazy Sunday morning. Think a glass of wine as you wind down to an acoustic set on a Friday evening. Think fresh seafood sourced straight from the Otago harbour. Mouth watering yet?

15007713_1186872841397656_356376361_o

I think the best thing about Starfish is that every time I go there (and believe me, it’s an embarrassing amount), it’s a whole new experience. I never tire of the ever-changing menu, and there is such a huge array of options to choose from and I don’t think I could ever sample everything. For all you social media enthusiasts (*raises a guilty hand*), do not fret; everything at Starfish is Insta-worthy. And for all you difficult dietary chums (*raises another guilty hand*), they’ve got you covered. Dairy free? Gluten free? Vegetarian? Look no further.

If there is one place you should go to experience the essence of Dunedin’s café culture on your travels, Starfish is the one. Perhaps one of the only stale points is that it is not within walking distance of the town centre, limiting it to those with access. However, if an outing to St. Clair is not already on your to do list, then I honestly don’t know what you’re doing here. Nestled in a plethora of boutique shops and restaurants – not to mention the most photogenic beach in New Zealand (am I biased? …probably), just one visit will be enough to convince you to ditch your return ticket home. Just make sure you’ve packet a scarf and gloves in your suitcase. Brr.

14975745_1186872708064336_1498007093_o

My Starfish Breakfast Order

  • Pics Poles Smoothie
  • Blueberry, Coconut & Lemon Hotcakes
  • Citrus Slice

(note to self: don’t complain when you no longer fit your jeans)

Also, a handy tip; if you’re eyeing up one of their famous smoothies (I recommend the Pics Poles; possibly the best peanut butter creation to ever grace the earth), make sure you get in there before 3pm or else the blender gets put away for the day. Believe me, I’ve made this mistake many times; tears were shed.

The ‘Deats

Starfish Café, Restaurant & Bar

240 Forbury Road, St. Clair, Dunedin, New Zealand

Sunday-Tuesday 7am-5pm

Wednesday-Saturday 7am til late

03 455 5940

15034287_1186873011397639_186313313_o

Continue Reading