8 Cultural Tips You Need to Know Before Traveling to Dubai

Dubai – the City of Gold – has long been included in most people’s lists of places to go before they die. The most liberated city in the Arab region never fails to show the world that there is no such thing as impossible. It is home to many of the world’s top man-made wonders, after all.

If you are one of the many travelers who still have Dubai to check off on your list of places to visit, there is no doubt that you will marvel at this city when you do come. There is an abundance of adventurous activities here. Furthermore, if you want to treat yourself to a luxurious getaway, there is no shortage of luxurious hotels and resorts in Dubai ready to enthral you in every possible way.

Suffice it to say, Dubai is ready for you.

But are you ready for it?

This desert city, while committed to growth and progress, is still very much rooted in its Arab culture. Are you aware of Dubai’s customs? If not, then you better learn so you can avoid getting into trouble with the locals and the law.

There are activities and behaviours you may think to be neutral in other countries that could actually be deemed scandalous – even criminal – in Dubai. Listed below are eight important points for you to learn about the city’s local culture and customs.

Drinking alcohol is no casual activity here

You may find restaurants in Dubai that advertise their happy hour, but you can’t just head on over and freely order a drink.  Residents need to present an alcohol license to be sold any alcoholic beverage.

You can, however, enjoy a beer or glass of wine as a traveler without an alcohol license – but only if you purchase it at a licensed hotel, bar or restaurant, and stay within its premises the whole time. Also, it’s imperative to note that you must not consume excessive amounts of alcohol because exhibiting drunken behavior is not tolerated in Dubai.

Loud and wild parties are no-nos

Dubai may have a flourishing social scene, but local culture dictates great consideration for others despite the frivolity of an event. Loud music and dancing are frowned upon, and may even land you in jail for being a disturbance to others.

Public displays of affection are considered indecent

You may be spending your getaway at a romantic ocean view hotel, but keep the affection for your spouse (yes, it has to be someone you’re married to) in the bedroom.

Kissing, hugging or cuddling, and holding hands in public are all considered lascivious acts. Many have landed in jail simply because they didn’t know Dubai remains that conservative when it comes to physical affection.

Cussing is always an offence

There is no tolerance for vulgar language in Dubai, be it said or in written form (like on a shirt or a post on social media). Observe local culture sensitivities about ‘defamatory language’, because failure to do so can easily land you in jail.

A lot of visitors and expats learned this lesson the hard way, so if you’re coming to the City of Gold for the first time and you’re used to cussing like a sailor, do your best to hold your tongue. Even if it’s just a casual expression for you, and is not directed toward anybody, you still run the risk of spending a night in jail.

Modest dressing is the norm

Desert weather is super-hot, but remember to stay covered to avoid generating unwanted attention and getting fined. That means no to clothing that shows too much leg, arms, and chest, for both men and women.

Dubai is the most tolerant city in all of the Middle East, but it still holds strict rules of propriety. Visitors of the city should avoid breaking these rules.

There exist strict photography laws

The UAE has strict photography laws, which protect its conservative locals, as well as sacred sites and buildings of power.  Keep an eye out for signs indicating that picture-taking is not allowed.

Moreover, if you wish to take snapshots of the locals – especially women – get their consent first (which is a little tricky to do because casually chatting up women can be considered a form of harassment). In Dubai and the rest of the UAE, it is deemed rude and intrusive to just suddenly take pictures of people around you. Failure to uphold these photography laws can lead to an arrest or hefty fines.

Use your right hand for doing most things

The left hand is considered the dirty hand in Muslim cultures. Avoid using it when meeting people for the first time, opening doors, and most importantly, when eating.

Don’t eat in public during Ramadan

Show respect for the Muslims who fast during Ramadan. You do not have to fast along with them, however, avoid eating where you can be seen during this time to demonstrate social sensitivity as the Muslim majority of Dubai’s population.

Article 313 of the Penal Code actually considers it a criminal offense for anyone (irrespective of faith) to consume food or drinks in public at daytime during Ramadan. Violation of this law can lead to a month-long imprisonment or a fine of Dhs 2,000.

Knowing these important points will keep you from committing social mistakes that could ruin your time in Dubai. Keep your trip classy, and observe, respect, and learn from the local culture, especially if the customs are different to what you are used to. With these things in mind, your Dubai experience is sure to be spectacular.

Author Bio

Thomas Grundner is the Vice President of Sales and Marketing for JA Resorts & Hotels. He has more than 20 years of expertise in the hospitality and leisure industry – across international markets including Germany, Egypt and Spain. Grundner oversees all sales, marketing and revenue efforts as the company continues to build on its key growth and development strategies and further cultivates its unique blend of ‘Heartfelt Hospitality’ and ‘Casual Luxury’.

Photographs courtesy of Unsplash

If you’re interested in learning more about social customs in different cultures, be sure to spare a moment for my experience in Egypt’s conservative climate. Open Season: Being a Ginger in Egypt is waiting for you…

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Everything You Need to Know About Booking an Ethical Safari

For most people, going on a safari is a once in a lifetime opportunity. For a lucky few – such as the people who operate safari tours in Africa – it becomes a way of life.

For these people, every day is an opportunity to interact with nature. They are privileged to personally experience some of the most intimate aspects of the wild. From the birth of a lion cub, to the hunt and capture of prey, the natural world is simply fascinating. There are few things in this world that will inspire and fill you with wonder as much as witnessing the majesty of nature undisturbed.

However, it pays to highlight that last word: undisturbed. Is it really possible to attend a safari whilst leaving the environment untouched? How do acts of tourism affect natural wildlife? If a safari is on your bucket list, issues like these might have you questioning whether it’s really such a great idea after all.

Allow us to introduce ethical safaris

Ethical safari companies practice responsible tourism to make it possible for tourists to enjoy the safari experience whilst promoting ethical standards and practices. These standards include protecting the health, safety and wellbeing of safari wildlife. For example, an ethical safari would never promote interaction with the animals that might harm them or disturb their natural environment, such as petting, handling, or hunting. Ethical safaris operate for the purpose of fostering education and appreciation for the natural world, rather than sportsmanship or exploitation of wildlife.

By practicing responsible tourism now, ethical safaris afford us the opportunity to observe nature – undisturbed – long into the future.

Responsible tourism… what’s it all about?

Simply put, responsible tourism is tourism that benefits the environment, animals, and people. It’s about respect for the ethical, racial, and political sensitivities of different cultures. There are a lot of facets to responsible tourism – and plenty of ways to unwittingly cross the line – however for the most part, this respect can be upheld through common sense.

With nature-based tourism such as safaris, we need to be looking at the impact our actions have on the natural environment. In order to thrive, natural ecosystems work towards maintaining a consistent balance. When something upsets this balance – for example, human intrusion – the natural system is disturbed. Food sources might be eliminated, or habitats destroyed. Consistently intruding upon the environment can devastate the natural inhabitants.

Our goal is to learn more about and enjoy our world while respecting that we have an obligation to minimize the impact of our actions. Protecting the earth’s natural environments ensures that species of animals and plants don’t risk extinction. It’s a promise to future generations that we will do our part to not only leave the world the way it was found, but hopefully to also make it a better place. Without a commitment to responsible and ethical tourism, much of what we take for granted today might someday only be experienced through history books. We’ve been trusted with the earth; it’s our job to protect it.

What to look for in an ethical safari

It’s nearly impossible to attend a safari and not be in complete awe of the world around you. But to maintain the natural environments of the animals, it is crucial that we take care to impede upon them as little as possible.

Before booking a safari, it’s a good idea to do a little research. Start by looking at each company, their mission statements and commitment to the community. Call and ask questions. If you’re unsure as to how to go about this, a travel agent who has experience in helping people find ethical safaris is a valuable resource. Finally, you can also contact South Africa National Parks to learn more.

Here are 8 things to be mindful of before booking your safari…

  • Safety should always be the number one priority. Your safari provider should have a strict set of rules for behaviors in place to protect both you and the animals.
  • There should be a focus on understanding that the animals aren’t there for entertainment purposes only. Guests should walk away from an ethical safari having been educated.  
  • Expect to view natural animal behaviors. During an ethical safari, you should never observe an animal being coerced into performing tricks or other showman-like behavior.
  • Look for safari providers that are committed to the local community or involved in conservation projects. These providers are more likely to adhere to ethical practices.
  • Ethical safaris should support sustainable practices. There should be little – if any – focus on souvenirs, especially those that are sourced directly from the environment. Avoid sales of items crafted using animal parts, natural artifacts or endangered plant life.
  • Ethical safaris will not permit the handling of wildlife; don’t expect to be able to cuddle the baby animals.
  • Avoid booking nighttime safaris unless they take place in an area where there are nocturnal animals only. Headlights, flashlights and camera flashes are disruptive to the nighttime habitat and sleep patterns of most animals.
  • Ethical safaris will limit the number of vehicles and attendees per safari so as to not overstimulate or intrude upon the animals and environment.

The number one goal of an ethical safari provider is to protect and preserve the health and safety of the animals and their environment – and you! No safari should ever endanger any for the sake of tourism.

If you’re interested in booking an ethical safari, we can guide you in the right direction. We at DK Grand Safaris are committed to responsible tourism, and offer a variety of safari services to fulfil your bucket list. We want to host you on one of our amazing adventures, like a Kenyan Photographic Safari, Masai Mara Migration Safari, Gorilla Trek, or other unique experience throughout Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia. Contact us today to learn more.

If you want to learn more about how you can be an ethical traveler and support animal rights, then the Reality of Elephant Riding in Thailand might be of great interest to you 🐘

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4 Reasons Why Travel is Rewarding for Everyone

People travel for lots of different reasons. Whether you’re setting off on your dream holiday, taking the opportunity to go traveling in between studying, or getting some much-needed time away from the everyday grind, visiting another country (or countries) is on a lot of people’s to-do lists.

No matter what your motivations are, it’s an experience you’ll never forget — for all the right reasons. But in case you need convincing, here are four reasons why travel is rewarding for everyone…

You’ll learn about different cultures

Staying in a place which has different traditions, a different way of living, and a different way of thinking to what you’re accustomed to can be a bit of a shock to start with. But over time, you’ll become more open-minded and learn to see and understand life from the locals’ perspective (even if you don’t always share the same opinions).

A particularly vivid memory of mine is when I spent several weeks in Vietnam and had the opportunity to learn the process of growing rice and experience riding a water buffalo. At the time, I wasn’t convinced by the prospect of getting my hands dirty (literally), but afterwards, I had a newfound appreciation for rural Vietnamese life and agriculture.

In addition to locals, you’ll meet new people from all over the world; some of whom may become friends you will stay in touch with long after your trip is over.

You’ll have new experiences and give your brain a workout

Travel can be the perfect way to mix things up if you’re stuck in a rut. New places, new food, better weather (sometimes!)… all of these combine to create something fresh, which is ideal when you need a break. You could even take a class — why not try learning traditional dancing in India or cooking in Thailand?

Furthermore – just like any other muscle – your brain needs exercise. Being thrown into a new situation is an excellent way of making it work hard. The pathways in the brain that are used most often stay strong, whilst those that aren’t are more likely to become weaker. Having a break from your usual routine will force the lesser-used parts of the brain to become active, so the more you travel and try new things, the stronger your brain becomes.

You can tailor the trip to suit you

Whether you’re a student on a gap year, a family of four, a traveller with a medical condition or an office worker taking a break, the flexibility of modern travel means your plans can be shaped around your needs. This means that it’s worth doing some research to find deals that suit you.

There are lots of options available. A quick internet search will take you to the most thrifty budget options if you’re cautious about spending too much money or need to book family-friendly accommodation.

Don’t forget; travel doesn’t have to be exclusive. There’s plenty of information online about the best destinations for disabled travellers. Any attraction worth its salt will have taken accessibility into account, with many providing designated tours, guides, and mobility aids such as wheelchairs.

You’ll overcome challenges

Unexpected hiccups happen. It’s part of life, and it’s part of travelling. But don’t let that put you off — you’ll get a confidence boost after you deal with them and you’ll be better equipped for the future.

The day I had planned to visit Ha Long Bay (because apparently everything happens in Vietnam), I was struck with ceaseless bad luck: first I woke up terribly ill. Then my friend and I were given the wrong itinerary and nearly missed the bus. Then I left half of my luggage in the hotel room. Then I had hot coffee spilt all over me. And then – just to top it off – our boat was cancelled and replaced with one not nearly as thrilling as the one we had booked and paid for.

Things weren’t exactly what you would call smooth-sailing (pun intended). Nevertheless, I was left with two options: either let a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity fly by, or chug on. As I wrote in my blog post, despite all of the misfortunes, three shining positives came out of what was set to be a very negative experience. 1) I saw the unforgettable grandeur of Ha Long Bay 2) I gained the confidence that I can take ownership in a sticky situation 3) I unearthed the ability to put a dreadful incident behind me and see it, not as a waste of money, but as a learning curve.

You’d be surprised at what you can do when you need to solve a problem, and there are few things more rewarding than successfully tackling any obstacles in your path.

This article was co-written with Matthew

Matthew has always been a weekend traveller. He is currently finishing his Master’s degree in Forestry and Environmental Studies, and works as a freelance writer for a few travel and pro-environment websites. He has traveled to Europe and North America, and he’s planning to tour around Asia once he’s completed his studies.

Photographs courtesy of Unsplash

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Guest Post: How to Live the Japanese Language While Learning It

For people who strive to learn a second language, it isn’t enough to simply be adept at speaking it. A lot of the time, the decision to learn something as complex as another language isn’t entirely academic in nature (though it may partly be the case). Fortunately this desire to immerse oneself into the culture of the foreign language they’re working hard to master goes hand in hand with the spoken language itself. Japan is the perfect example of a country whose language most people want to learn because they wish to feel closer to its impressive and often fascinating culture.

Of course, such an endeavor is certainly easier said than done. However, there’s a reason why traveling to Japan in order to live the language while learning it is so rewarding. Those looking for a bit of a crash course in everything Japan has to offer with a long-term goal of mastering the language will no doubt learn all its little intricacies all the faster, but that doesn’t make it any less challenging. Here are just a few tips to living the language while simultaneously learning it.

Go for Japanese cuisine (it’s how the country speaks to your stomach)

The first suggestion is also probably the most fun to do – learning to live the language by experiencing Japan’s rich tapestry of cuisine. After all, a very large part of a country’s history is directly tied to their diets. It might seem like a rather far-fetched idea, but you’ll soon understand things about the country you might never have thought possible when you’ve had your fill of their authentic recipes. While being in Japan to enjoy true authentic cuisine would be the most obvious course of action, this is something that can be enjoyed in all parts of the world because of how much other countries and cultures are fascinated by what Japan has to offer.

Try and picture yourself enjoying succulent yakitori from a stand in Japan, while speaking to one of the natives. You ask questions as you observe their body language, from the way they speak to the way the natives enjoy their own stick of yakitori. Even something as simple as enjoying street food in Japan can be an invaluable experience when it comes to not just learning the language, but living it as well.

Attend the multitude of Japanese festivals

Living the Japanese language means to live its culture, and there are few events that match the cultural significance of the Japanese festival. The amount of history they have on display – whether you are attending a festival in Fukuoka or perhaps in Kyoto, is always a sight to see. After all, where else would you be able to get yourself acquainted with all the sights and sounds Japan has to offer all in the span of a single incredible event? It can’t be understated how much you can learn by simply attending one of the country’s many festivals.

Even the natives of Japan understand just how important attending a festival can be. Normally you would see a divide between the younger and older generations of the Japanese people due to events that have shaped the country. However, no matter what the age group is, there are very few people who do not enjoy attending these festivals. This only means that not only do you get to taste and experience the culture of Japan all in one place, but you also get to communicate and interact with natives from all walks of life.

Break the ice by enjoying Japan’s hot springs

While it’s indeed important to have a serious passion when it comes to learning and living the Japanese life, it doesn’t have to be devoid of any rest and relaxation. As a matter of fact one of the best ways to immerse yourself in Japanese culture while being able to soak the stresses away would be by enjoying Japan’s world-famous hot springs, or onsen as they would call it. Located in Hokkaido, these natural hot springs are littered with natives and tourists alike, giving you a wide variety of people to interact and bounce ideas with while you take a rest. Why not? It’s a wonderful way to learn all about Japan, while still treating it like a carefree vacation.

Visit Japan’s historical castles and ancient temples

Japan is a country with a deep and vibrant history. One might think that researching the history of the Japanese people and learning the language are completely different – but they are different sides of the same coin. It only exists when both work in tandem; otherwise neither will survive because they helped shape each other through the decades and centuries. While it’s indeed possible to learn all about the history of the Japanese people through different websites and written works, actually stepping into an ancient temple or historical castle in Japan allows for a completely different perspective – you can even get the help of Japanese translation services if you have troubles during your study.

The castles in particular were a part of the intense and more violent periods of Japan’s history, and the ruins are something that can give you a peak at what Japan was like at that time. By learning all about its rich culture and speaking to the Japanese about how they might feel about their country’s history, you’ll get a great deal of insight – which is one of the most essential things in mastering the language.

There are many who will most likely tell you that learning a language is something that shouldn’t be taken lightly. While they’re completely right, there’s no reason that it can’t be fun – and living the language while learning it is most certainly that. If you’re serious about diving into everything that makes this wonderful country great, don’t hesitate! Pack your bags and get ready for the learning experience of a lifetime that you will not regret at all.

Sean Hopwood, MBA is founder and President of Day Translations, Inc., an online translation and over the phone interpreter provider, dedicated to the improvement of global communications. By helping both corporations and the individual, Day Translations provides a necessary service at the same time as developing opportunities for greater sympathy and understanding worldwide.

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All photographs courtesy of Unsplash.

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Guest Post: 84 Days in Japan

All throughout high school, I studied the Japanese language.  Each year my class got smaller but I really enjoyed it, and by the time I was in my senior year, I was the only person left in the class.  I stuck at it for five years, but when I began university, I just stopped.  What a waste!

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Then one day, while sitting in the library in between lectures, an old friend from high school bumped into me. He asked if I would be interested in a job at a ski resort hotel in Japan over the New Zealand summer, as his cousin was one of the managers there.  I’m super into snowboarding and thought this would be a great opportunity to continue my study of Japanese.  About three months later, I was on a flight direct from Christchurch International to Narita Airport where I would spend 4 nights in Tokyo before moving to Hakuba in Nagano for the next two and half months.

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My First Impressions

Japan is clean.  Flying into Tokyo – a city of 13 million people – I expected a lot of litter and graffiti, but there was none.  Between giant high rise buildings, a massive subway system and countless poorly lit alleyways, I didn’t see any graffiti the whole time. For a country with such a complicated litter system (rubbish must be separated into burnables and non-burnables, and non-burnables need to be organised into glass, cans, and plastic bottles with the labels and caps removed, plus only certain types of cardboard are accepted for recycling) there was no litter.  When trains stopped in at stations, workers would even jump in with a backpack vacuum cleaner and give the carriages a once over.

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Japanese people are so nice.  They are so trusting and honest. People will be sitting in a packed café in a train station and they’ll just stand up and leave their laptop/bag/wallet unattended at a table as they walk up to order.  They are so patient, they’ll wait as you stumble through a sentence in Japanese and let you practice, even if they speak English.

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For example, during my time in Tokyo, I was trying to go to an aquarium but got off at the wrong station and had to ask for directions.  I found a man sitting out on the riverbed I was walking around having his lunch break, and asked “魚の動物園は どこですか”, which translates to “Where is the fish zoo?”  He didn’t know, but he googled it for me and showed me how to get there on his phone, then taught me the word for aquarium.

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Japan is efficient.  The subway system and bus system run to the minute.  If the timetable says a bus will leave Shinjuku at 8:15am and arrives in Hakuba at 1:16pm, it will hit those times perfectly.  Once I wrapped my head around the rail system, it was so easy.  Originally I was trying to work out where I was going, how much it costs, and buying a paper ticket every time I wanted to train somewhere (which was multiple times a day), but once I bought a suica card, everything was so much easier. I would just top it up, scan as I entered a station, and scan as I exited the next station where it would deduct the fair automatically.

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Where I Stayed in Tokyo

In Tokyo, I stayed in an art gallery/youth hostel called ArtnShelter.  It was super cheap and a really cool atmosphere.  I slept in a box about 130cm tall and wide and 220cm deep. It was right beside a train station which made life super easy, and downstairs they had a bar, which was completely angled towards getting people talking to strangers and meeting new people.  One of the ways they did this was by making shots 50% off if you bought one for a stranger.

What I Did in Tokyo

I was painfully aware of how little time I had in Tokyo so I had to get straight into my touristy sightseeing.

I arrived on the 29th of November at about 4:45pm, but because I had to get a residency card to be able to work here, I didn’t get through customs and out of the airport until around 6pm.  I went straight to my hotel in Narita (about 1.5 hours by train north of Tokyo central) to drop my bags and then went out for dinner. After 15 hours of travelling, I wasn’t up to much else!

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On the 30th, I made my way from Narita down to Shinagawa, where I would be staying for the rest of my time.  Instead of going direct, I caught my first train underneath the airport to Ueno, where I was able to walk around the famous Ueno Park and visit Ueno Zoo.

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On the 1st, I caught a train up to Jimbocho, a full district in Tokyo purely dedicated to ski and snowboard shops.  Literally hundreds of snow sport shops all right next to each other, including department stores of up to 8 stories tall selling goggles, clothes, boards, skis, bindings, boots and everything else you could possibly need.

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On the 2nd was my trip to the Shinagawa Aquarium, where I discovered that Japan goes crazy for Christmas. All of the fish tanks were fully decorated, inside and out, where scuba divers conducting shows and feeding the fish were dressed up as Santa Claus.

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On the 3rd I did my final site seeing, visiting Zojo-ji (a massive Buddhist temple built at its site in Tokyo in 1598) and taking the elevator up Tokyo tower where I could see out over the whole city and more, as far as Mount Fuji.  Later, I went to Shinjuku to catch the 6:15pm bus to Hakuba, where I would live for the next two months.

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I arrived in Hakuba expecting layers of snow, but it was just cold with no snow in site.  On the 4th, I walked around the town and settled in to my new home.  I share a room with 3 other guys; it is split into an upstairs bit and a downstairs bit, with two beds in each.  There was very little space and no storage at all. The only heater in the room was downstairs, and the window in the upstairs bit had no curtains, so me and my roomie set out to make some renovations; covering the window in bubble wrap and making a spider web of wire between the walls and roof to hang stuff from.

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The Work

We started work on the 5th of December, and for the first 10 days I wasn’t enjoying life. The hotel I work at closes for 6 months over summer and is just locked and left on the last day of the ski season, so it requires a lot of TLC when it needs to open up again.  I spent 10 days shovelling snow, chopping firewood, changing lights bulbs, moving furniture, dusting, vacuuming, cleaning bathrooms, removing bee hives, and other fun stuff like that.

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But then I got to start my proper job as a concierge.  A standard work day for me is waking up at 6am to negative double digit temperatures, walking downstairs to sit in front of a heater and eat breakfast before layering up and walking 10 minutes to work at 7am.  The first hour I spend shovelling snow out of the driveway and clearing it off the vans, filling up the kerosene heater in the hotel drying room, filling up the firewood in the hotel restaurant and sweeping the entrance way.  From 8am to around 10:30am I load skis and people in and out of the vans and drive them to the various resorts in the valley.  From 10:30ish to 1pm, I take the hotel and staff accommodation rubbish to the dump, shovel the carpark, driveway, pathways and roof, shop at the supermarket for the kitchen and answer phone calls in the office.  I get a break from 1-3pm which if I’m quick is enough time to run up to the nearest chairlift and get some runs in.  Then from 3-5pm I’m picking guests up from the ski resorts. 5-6pm is spent filling the vans, shovelling more snow and closing up the shuttle service for the night.

My Days Off

I get two days off per week (usually) which I normally spend up at Hakuba Goryu ski field where I have a season pass.  I wish I could get out to other resorts in the valley too, but because pay is monthly, I have to be pretty strict with my budgeting.

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If I’m not out snowboarding on my day off, I’m trying to explore various places. One week I switched my days off around to get 3 in a row, and was able to visit a mate in Tokyo. We spent a few days site-seeing, including a full day hiking around various temples in Kamakura. This week, another friend of mine came to Hakuba for two days and we trekked out to see the Jigokudani Snow Monkey Hot Springs. We went up for his first day snowboarding the next.  Some nights, I am able to head up the mountain after work for night skiing, but as only one slope is open, I usually head home to shower, eat and sleep after my 11 hour work day.

The Best Parts

This working holiday has been great for my Japanese language skills. With constant exposure to Japanese writing, I’ve become a much faster reader and have learnt so many more kanji characters.  Hearing the language daily has made me a much better listener, but working at an English speaking hotel where all the other staff are Australian has meant I haven’t had as much conversation practice as I would like. However, my trips to the supermarket and interacting with locals has given me a lot of opportunities to speak anyway.  I am now much more enthusiastic and motivated to continue my Japanese study when I return home.

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The Worst Parts

Working 7am to 6pm, 5 days a week has been really tough. This was especially the case during big dumps of snow, as all of the shovelling can make me completely exhausted and super moody.  The amount of time I have to commit to work means I don’t get as many opportunities to snowboard and explore Japan as I would like, and it means I have to prioritise what I want to do with my time off.

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My Final Thoughts

Overall, I have really enjoyed this experience.  For someone who has no summer job and really wants to study the culture and language, I think it is an amazing opportunity!

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However, would I do it again?  No.  I will definitely come back to Japan, but I think my plan for next time will be to work in New Zealand, then travel here for 4 weeks on a budget backpacking holiday. While I won’t have the constant exposure to the language that I have had for the last 2 months, I will be able to do much more travelling, and hopefully backpack from the southern tip all the way up to the north.

About the Author

Tom Maslin is a second-year Mechatronics Engineering and German Language student, at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand.

He is an avid snowboarder, track and field athlete, and works as a private tutor for NCEA high school students in Mathematics and Science.

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