6 Things I’ve Learned in 6 Months as a Travel Blogger

It’s hard to believe that it was a whole six months ago that I launched the Ginger Passports. I feel as though it was just the other week that I was frustratingly trying to work out what hosting platforms and domain names were (*cue traumatic technological flashbacks*). Fortunately, the good times have far outweighed the bad, and I’m still here going strong 💪

To celebrate 182 days (give or take) as a travel blogger, I’ve rounded up the six most significant things I have learned along the way. Whether you use these as inspiration for starting your own blogging enterprise, or you’re simply curious, I hope everyone can take something away from this post!

I remember how when I was conducting my own research into personal experiences of blogging before I decided to take the big leap, a recurring theme connecting all bloggers was their insistence on being driven by passion rather than forces such as money. I would roll my eyes, both at the cheesiness and seeming impracticality of that advice.

Well, it just so turns out that the joke is on me, because the only thing you can rely on in this endeavour is your own enthusiasm. When you enter the blogging sphere, it’s easy to be blinded by the potential for making revenue and enjoying free perks such as sponsored products. Whilst I have certainly reaped the benefits of the latter, I would be lying through my teeth if I said that those perks make everything worth it. I have invested hours upon hours into this blog, and at the end of the day, I have relatively little to show in terms of earnings. Well… little. Well… none. But the point is, I have also loved every single minute of it, and that knowledge in itself is enough to drive me forwards.

To quote the Beatles, “I get by with a little help from my friends”.

I may be confident creating content, but I am certainly no expert when it comes to technology. Truth be told, the reason it took me so long to actually get a blog up and running was because I couldn’t navigate the technicalities. Hosting platform? Domain name? Bitch please, I struggle to operate my TV remote.

Fortunately for me, I was approached by a good friend who studies IT, and was offered his services. We have been working together for most of 2017, and the Ginger Passports has certainly benefited from it. Without him, I would probably still be on wordpress.com with a website looking as though it were designed by a fourth grader.

Long story short, what I’m trying to communicate here is that sometimes you just need to put your pride to one side and ask for help (or accept it, in my case). Furthermore, there’s something undeniably rewarding about being part of a team. It can get awfully lonely otherwise.

When I was first developing this blog, I – being as stubborn as I am – was hell-bent that I would publish a new post three times a week regardless of circumstances. Oh, if only.

Tying back into the first point about passion, sticking to a schedule in a context such as this relies largely on motivation. If you wake up on Sunday morning, realise that you have only published two posts in the past seven days, but cannot for the life of you find a couple of hours to draft something up between all of your other commitments, then guess what? You’re not the massive failure you think you are.

I have the luxury of not being held accountable by anyone for missing my weekly goal of three posts – save perhaps myself, who is a pretty merciless judge. Unrealistic expectations aside, this luxury means I have the flexibility to roll with the punches and write when the mood takes me. Generally, my passion for blogging squeezes out at least two posts a week, but that’s not always the case. And you know what? That’s okay. If I sacrificed the joy of flexible blogging to meet my tri-weekly goal right from the outset, I would not be here six months later writing this post.

I’m talking about the two C’s here: content and collaborations.

Regarding content, there have been some subject matters I have written about that I was scared would backfire and earn a negative reception. Likewise, there were some that dealt with issues I don’t have a knowledge base in, and wasn’t entirely confident writing about. Nevertheless, I gritted my teeth and clicked ‘publish’. I figured that I have to start somewhere, and I can’t just discuss travel playlists and Balinese villas named after Ariana Grande for the rest of my blogging career.

Collaborating was also an intimidating prospect for me. Infact, it wasn’t until a couple of months ago that I finally mustered the courage to start emailing brands and bloggers about the possibility of working together. Now, I’m not trying to deceive you; I estimate that approximately 90% of those that I reach out to either ignore or politely decline my offers. But the key point worthy of highlighting here is that 10% accepted. There are plenty of exciting projects in the works thanks to those 10%; you might have already read about my campaign with Organic Initiative. Not unlike creating content that exceeded my comfort zone, I took risks and they paid off.

I welcome any excuse to channel my inner Monica Gellar.

Perhaps the most important resource I use to keep my blog developing is planning. The easiest way to lose track of your goals is not to have any, but setting those goals is only half the job. The other half entails actually working out how to achieve them.

As I have mentioned numerous times over the course of this post, my goal is to publish (roughly) three posts per week. I manage to reach that goal most of the time (*cough*) by planning in advance. On the last day of each month, I set aside time to brainstorm which posts I will write, and on what days I shall publish them. On a similar note, I also track my blog statistics on this same day for the past month, compare these figures with other months, analyse what were the strengths and weaknesses and decide how I can capitalise on these in future.

Planning is not only productive, but thoroughly gratifying as well. There’s nothing like ticking off the tasks on your to do list one by one, and the sense of accomplishment you gain is yet another of those driving forces behind your motivation.

I know, I know… that sounds absolutely bonkers. That’s like saying ‘you don’t have to wear make up to be a make up blogger’.

But it’s true! The beauty of travel blogging is that a majority of your readership are not going to be from where you live. I call New Zealand home, and have received so many lovely messages from readers across the globe asking about this beautiful country. I have written so many posts about Dunedin without having to travel more than ten minutes from my front door. By viewing the city through the lens of an outsider, I have actually felt like a tourist. It was something I didn’t think I would ever have the opportunity to experience.

I have also enjoyed writing about things that extend beyond geographical location. Some of my favourite posts include 5 Travel Tattoos That Don’t Scream PINTEREST and the No-Bullsh*t Guide to Saving Money to Travel for Young Adults, both of which did not require me to buy a plane ticket or even sacrifice the warmth and comfort of my bed.

I have gone six months without traveling (save for a sneaky wee trip three hours west to Central Otago) and still have ideas up my sleeve for future blog posts. Travel blogging has taught me to find inspiration in everything, and that is certainly something I don’t take for granted.

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Traveling with the F-Word (That’s Right…Feminism)

Let’s have a little talk, shall we?

As a gender studies student, I was determined that I would somehow incorporate a blog post discussing this wonderful thing called feminism. For those of you that are not acquainted with feminism – or perhaps need a little refreshing in the midst of the anti-feminist backlash – allow me to welcome you back into the classroom.

Feminism is essentially the advocacy of women’s rights on the ground of the equality of the sexes. And when I say ‘essentially’, what I mean is that I copied and pasted that right out of the dictionary. Plagiarism points for me.

Gender equality – or inequality, I should say – bleeds into every area of life. We hear about the gender ratio in parliament, the wage gap between female and male employees, and even the extent of legal independence women should have in some parts of the world. As important as these issues are, there is a further niche where gendered assumptions and expectations permeate, however implicitly: travel.

In the travel arena, I am a very privileged individual. Pretending otherwise will not do anyone any good. I’m privileged because I grew up in a safe country rich with opportunity (shout out to New Zealand), am from a financially stable background and have a supportive family who encourage anything and everything I set my mind to. The term ‘privilege’ receives a bad reputation because it includes connotations of individuals who have never had to work a day in their life, don’t understand what it means to be confronted with setbacks, and who are generally just ‘bad people’. I acknowledge that the avenues I have taken to make progress towards my goals may not have been characterised by the hardship many other people experience, but that doesn’t automatically make me unworthy of enjoying them. Accepting that I am in a position of privilege – as uncomfortable as that process may be – affords me the opportunity to overcome the prevailing obstacle in the way of holding myself partly accountable for the injustice in today’s society.

Travel can be a feminist pursuit through many means. Anything that furthers women’s ability to achieve things that society may not necessarily acknowledge or approve of for women is a feminist issue. This article will illustrate 3 tropes which you – as a female traveler – can identify to challenge the mentalities that prevent women from participating in an equal and rewarding experience of the world 💪

The “Settle Down” Trope

You know what I’m talking about – the idea that a woman has only succeeded at being a woman if she has managed to land a job, find a man, slap a ring on her finger and pop out two or three young ‘uns. That, ladies and gentleman, is the arithmetic of womanhood. Anything that strays from this paragon means she has failed.

One of the many problems with this trope is that it doesn’t accommodate goals such as travel. How is a woman supposed to maintain a 9-5 job when she’s never in one place long enough to make the interview? How is a woman supposed to settle down if she doesn’t have the suburban house with the white picket fence? An airport is no place to raise children.

The reality is that this paradigm does not fit every woman. Truth be told, I would be surprised if any woman – or man, for that matter – was perfectly content following this preconceived course. Success is subjective, and in the words of Swami Vivekananda: “The idea of perfect womanhood is perfect independence.”

The “Vulnerable Woman” Trope

“But is it safe? You know… for a woman?” 

“Will you have a man with you?”

“No parent wants their daughter alone in a foreign country – you’re being selfish!”

If any of these sound familiar to you, then you will have been exposed to the Vulnerable Woman Trope. This is the one where – upon announcing your travel plans – people automatically latch onto the implications of your gender.

Now, I’m not stupid. I know that there are some places in the world that it would be simply irresponsible to venture alone. But there are also a lot of places that – while they certainly carry their risks – should not be off-limits for someone purely because they identify as a woman and not a man.

Statistics illustrate how men are actually twice as likely to experience violent assault committed by strangers than women. Yet, you rarely hear people warning their fellow male friends to avoid traveling alone. This fixation on the danger of solo female traveling only disseminates the cultural falsehood not only of women as vulnerable and helpless beings, but also of the conceptual impossibility of men as victims of crime. These ideas work to scare women out of expanding their comfort zone, and are all but an invitation for victim-blaming if a woman does happen to be assaulted whilst traveling on her own.

The take home message is that you should not let misogynistic stereotypes around female independence limit your opportunities. No one should travel somewhere without educating themselves on personal protection and welfare, and consulting the social and political landscape of any prospective country before booking those plane tickets should be a priority. Bear in mind that gendered advice around security can be delivered more for the purpose of reaffirming the Vulnerable Woman Trope rather than actually presenting a realistic view of safety. Traveling alone can be a rewarding and empowering experience – for both women and men – and we need to understand that threats to this independence are not all that meets then eye.

P.S. a fantastic resource for genuine advice on street harassment whilst traveling is this article by Everyday Feminism.

 

The “Woman = Things” Trope

When I was preparing to move overseas for the first time, I pulled a Marie Kondo and down-sized my possessions to the point where I could fit everything I owned into one suitcase. When I would share this with my friends, they would be astounded and ask how I could get rid of so much shit. And that’s what I want to emphasise – that it really was ‘shit’. It may have been shit I was admittedly attached to, but it was nevertheless shit. When it came down to it, I didn’t really need five pairs of Nikes. Nor did I really need three sets of reusable coffee flasks. Once I accepted that, a more minimalist lifestyle suddenly became a lot more appealing.

Society is obsessed with ‘things’ – and by ‘things’, I mean anything that you can buy/own. We tend to hierarchise people based on money; a habit propagated by commercialism and capitalism. We are taught that the more things we own, the more successful we are. We further observe this through the notion that shopping equals happiness.

Why is this a feminist issue, I hear you ask? Well, consider the relationship between females and shopping; the stereotype of women as ‘shopaholics‘ is well-established and reinforced by the philosophy that individuals that own a lot of stuff possess higher prestige and status. By going against the grain, females are gambling being judged as a lesser woman who has perhaps failed at cultural femininity.

Anyone who travels knows only too well that lugging bags upon bags of belongings wherever they go is a burden. Half the point of traveling is to detach yourself from material ownership and to feel at home – not within the four walls of a house – but by the quality of the people around you. A nomadic lifestyle is incompatible with the convention of women accumulating more and more stuff, which is all the more reason to challenge it.

Some final thoughts…

Travel provides many opportunities: the opportunity for new experiences, the opportunity to meet new people… and perhaps most importantly, the opportunity to learn.

Growing up in New Zealand, misogyny manifests in micro-aggressions. In other words, sexism is an implicit and underlying mechanism that characterises the female existence in a seemingly insignificant way (emphasis on the ‘seemingly’). But when I am in foreign places, the gender inequality can sometimes be so palpable, it’s like a slap to the face.

The downside to being a Kiwi is that it’s easy to take a relatively egalitarian society for granted. But through living in one of the more privileged countries in the world, us females have a political voice that is heard and respected. Educating first ourselves and then others about the injustices occurring in other societies is an opportunity that should not be undermined but rather encouraged.

Through a feminist approach to traveling, women become more aware and vocal of the inequalities plaguing humanity. I am a firm believer that social change is a bottom-up process, and what better way to start than by challenging the mentalities that reinforce sexist travel tropes.

Photos courtesy of Unsplash

Hungry for more? Be sure to check out my blog post: The Bucket List: Banksy’s Walled Off Hotel (Or Why Tourism is Political) 🌍

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The No-Bullsh*t Guide to Saving Money to Travel for Young Adults

Gather round kids, and welcome to the post that you’ll find on every travel blog!

But no, seriously. You know what I hate about these kinds of posts? They are directed at adults who have their own income and are living a lifestyle that is so far removed from the typical ‘student life’ that most advice is untransferable. These posts preach guidance such as finding a flat-mate and sacrificing the weekly nail appointment, when in reality, what young adult has enough money to fund living in a private flat in the first place, and what young adult has an extra $50 up their sleeve a week to splurge on their mani-pedi?

What’s missing from every online guide I have read is an orientation towards people my own age and walk of life.

I recently discussed on my post – Why I Hate the Word Wanderlust – how I believe that although saving to finance a trip can be “soul-crushing and demands sacrifice”, it is not impossible. I am not blind to the reality that factors such as privilege, opportunity and circumstance play a vast role in the success of this, but for the average university student who has a certain degree of flexibility and control over their time, is in a position where they are fortunate enough to put some money aside – and additionally, can prioritise this – I think that with a little self-discipline, travel isn’t as far out of reach as previously assumed.

So, sit back, relax and pull up your budget spreadsheets; you’re in for a wild ride 😎

Sharing is Caring

So I probably shouldn’t be encouraging this… and I apologise sincerely to network providers worldwide… but there’s a cheaper way to still access all your favourite tv shows.

I love Netflix. I love that I can watch my favourite shows (*ahem* Rick and Morty), and I love that I can watch them whenever the hell I want to. But you know what else I love? Leeching off my boyfriend’s account.

Yes, yes, I know. I’m that person.

Netflix can cost up to $15.99USD a month, which – while it doesn’t seem like a huge expense – can add up to nearly $200.00USD per year. If you can’t imagine curling into bed at night without seeing that iconic red logo materialise upon your laptop screen, search for a friend who is also paying for an account and inquire whether they would be happy to consider a cheaper alternative. Depending on your plan, you can access the same account on more than one device – and create individual personas – which is perfect for going halves and sharing.

Better still, stream straight from the web. Now, I’m not telling you to stream illegally… but I’m not not telling you to stream illegally. Wink wink nudge nudge.

Work, Work, Work, Work, Work…

Okay, so I can’t stand that song. But the most obvious way to make some extra dollar bills is to – yep, you guessed it – work.

When I was saving up to travel to Southeast Asia, I worked five part-time jobs on top of full-time university. As I wrote in a previous blog post, it was “social suicide – and admittedly not the best for my mental health – but it got me those plane tickets.” I know that working five part-time jobs is a little (okay, a lot) excessive, but I managed to earn $5000NZD in less than six-months without missing a single lecture.

If you’re studying in New Zealand, I highly recommend you sign up Student Job Search. This website was a life-saver for me when it came to finding part-time or casual work in the short term. Most of the listings started immediately and were updated daily, so I would log in every morning to find another selection of jobs up for grabs.

The beauty with finding employment is that it adds experience to your CV. That way, if you are looking for paid work overseas, you have the number one thing employees look for up your sleeve.

Cut the Coffee

Oh God, not the coffee!

If you’re anything like me, then you rely on your daily cup of joe to, y’know, function. Coffee is something of a necessity for university students, and don’t worry, I’m not suggesting you go cold turkey. Rather, I’m suggesting you make your own coffee at home and then take it on your whereabouts in a reusable cup for a fraction of the price rather than buy it at a café.

I am totally guilty of this. When my motivation is running low, sometime it is the promise of a delicious, steaming flat white from my favourite café that gets me out of bed in the morning. But the price difference from buying it compared to making it is ridiculous. Here’s the ridiculousness in numbers: if you are spending $3.5USD on a cup of coffee (as is the average cost in New Zealand) 5 days a week, then in 6 months, that would be saving of $455USD. $455US?! You could buy 20 nights in a standard hostel with that!

Embrace Your Inner Jaime Oliver

Whilst we’re on the topic, let’s address the elephant in the room: food.

When we make the transition from our parent’s home to a flat or other independent living situation, the freedom to make our own lifestyle choices can be almost too good to be true. If we have a few extra dollars on the side, it is tremendously tempting to forgo making a good, hearty meal from scratch and just ordering take out. This might especially be the case if we arrive home late after a long day of study, work or other commitments, and are too exhausted to attack the kitchen.

I’m not going to bore you with the maths here, but I dare say it is rather self-explanatory. As is the case with the coffee, dining out is decidedly expensive, and there is no reason why you can’t make food that tastes as good – if not better – at home.

Student Recipes is a fantastic online resource for finding delicious, budget-friendly dishes to whip up in a flash. I also recommend doing some good old fashioned food prep so that if you do find yourself getting in the door at some ungodly hour, the pizza delivery service won’t be as tempting. As long as you stick to your guns and keep takeout for special occasions (if at all), you’ll find your bank account looking more and more attractive in no time.

Happy Birthday!

If your family is keen on gift-giving at those special times of the year, don’t be afraid to ask for cold hard cash instead of a present. It may sound greedy – and even I am reluctant to employ this – but people will be delighted to know that their contribution is going to a worthy cause.

Whenever I receive money on my birthday, I always make it a priority to write to the giver and not only thank them for their kindness, but also tell them specifically what I will be putting it towards. That way, you are not only giving them a sense of purpose with their charity, but also holding yourself accountable for what you spend it on. The last thing you want to do is admit to your grandparents that you spent the money they gave you for that once-in-a-lifetime trip on three weeks worth of McDonalds.

Pop Some Tags

#throwback to 2012 and familiarise yourself with Macklemore’s Thrift Shop. It was my jam back then, I can still proudly rap along to all the words now.

The point I’m trying to make here is that shopping secondhand can be a game-changer when it comes to budgeting. This doesn’t just stop at clothing, either; it extends to textbooks (do you know how much that shit costs?!), electronics, furniture… you name it. Why would you spend retail price when you can score the same product for half of that?

Shopping secondhand doesn’t mean you have to lurk in those grotty charity shops that smell of mothballs and wet basements (you know what I’m talking about). Companies such as Amazon give you the option to buy discounted products that are still in great quality.

Once Upon a Time…

If you’re a total book worm (like me), then you should invest in a Kindle.

Did you know that the average hard-copy book (in New Zealand, at least) costs around $20USd?! An eBook costs half of that. Plus, you won’t have to lug around thick slabs of paper which sit in the corner and gather dust once you’ve finished it.

Granted, buying a Kindle device costs a wee bit, but the savings you will make from not buying hard-copy books in the long-run are exponentially worthwhile. Besides, there are certainly ways to score a discounted Kindle… what was that last point I discussed, again? 🤔

Lace Up Your Runners

Relax; I’m not about to suggest you start running. I’m not that evil. But what I am suggesting is that – if you own a car – you might want to consider alternative options.

Petrol is insanely pricey – not to mention the maintenance and service cars require on a regular basis. Then you have to pay for parking – and believe me, you haven’t experienced stress until you’re late to a lecture and can’t find a car park.

There are several methods of transport available to most city-slickers. Think walking, biking, car-pooling or catching public transport… at the extreme end of the scale, you might even consider selling your car. Imagine the budget-boost that would give you!

For example, instead of catching a taxi to town one Saturday night, consult the local bus timetable. To get to and from the centre of town, it costs me $30USD to employ the services of a private taxi but only $2USD to enjoy the company of strangers on a bus. It’s a no-brainer, really.

I understand that the ability to trade in the luxury of your car is heavily situation-dependent. If you live somewhere that has you rugging up in about five layers of clothing before you leave the house, you might want to think twice about walking. Likewise, sacrificing hours of your precious time to travel on foot might not be the best use of your time. But – as is the case with everything – it’s the little things that count.

Put Down That Wine Glass

Yeah… I’m really not going to be popular after this blog post.

I didn’t say saving is soul-crushing for nothing. For us young ‘uns, drinking is more often than not synonymous with getting wasted. I say this because in New Zealand, we have a really dangerous culture of binge-drinking, and in order to achieve this level of intoxication, it takes more than a can or two of beer.

The consequence of heavy drinking – aside from the detrimental health issues – is the effect on our wallets. Alcohol ain’t cheap, people!

The good news (depending on your perspective) is that there is an easy way to regulate your spending without going cold turkey. I don’t want to endorse unhealthy habits here, but if you insist on those big nights out, invest in pre-drinking rather than hitting up the pub. A glass of wine from the bar will cost nearly two thirds the price of a bottle purchased from the supermarket and enjoyed with your friends before venturing out into town. And don’t even get me started on the price of cocktails!

Surf Couches

If you haven’t already, open another tab, type in www.courchsurfing.com and sign up for an account now.

One of the most hideous expenses of travel – perhaps aside from those dang plane tickets – is accommodation. For many people, hotels are simply not an option, and even the going rates of some hostels make me cringe.

Couchsurfing is revolutionising budget travel for people of all walks of life. The online community connects hosts from every country on earth with adventurous and open-minded travellers. As written on their website: “travel like a local, stay in someone’s home and experience the world in a way money can’t buy”.

The key word here is money; the beauty of Couchsurfing is that you are not charged a single cent to stay in someone’s house. It’s always polite to thank your hosts in some way, but all we’re talking here is a cooked meal or shouting them a drink. Some token of gratitude. Furthermore, it’s a brilliant means to meet like-minded people and expose yourself to a different culture in a way that the four walls of a hotel suite cannot.

 

If you enjoyed this post, you might also like: the No-Bullsh*t Guide to Surviving a 12-Hour Flight ✈

All photos sourced form Unsplash

 

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How To Overcome A Bad Travel Experience

Let’s get real for a second.

As much as we — and our bank accounts — would like to believe, travel is not always roses and sunshine. Sometimes shit happens that is out of our control, and we are forced to learn very quickly how to best deal with it.

Late last year, my friend and I spent a month traveling Southeast Asia. One of the most anticipated components of the trip was an excursion to Ha Long Bay, a much acclaimed highlight of northern Vietnam. The plan was to get picked up from our hotel in Hanoi’s Old Quarter in the early morning, shuttle to Ha Long and then spend the next 24 hours enjoying the resplendent views the bay had to offer onboard a luxury junk boat.

Doesn’t sound like a lot of room for things to go sideways, right?

Wrong.

The first foreshadowing of the misery to follow began at the ungodly hour of 7.15am when we received a phone call from reception informing us that our shuttle bus was waiting for us. As our travel agent, previous tour guides and itinerary had notified, the earliest we would be picked up was around 8am. At 7.15am, we had neither packed nor eaten and were barely unconscious. Panicked, we sprang to action throwing clothes on and stuffing belongings into suitcases. Reception rang us multiple times during this rush to warn us that the shuttle would leave without us if we didn’t get our act together.

“Hurry up.” the lady snapped in an ill-mannered tone. Well, excuse you.

We checked out and made it to the shuttle in a record five minutes (how’s that for two teenage girls?). The driver flung our luggage into the back and then pushed us towards the back seat. We buckled ourselves down and issued sincere apologies to the six other passengers, all whom returned cold looks that suggested the feeling was not mutual.

It was only once the shuttle had left Hanoi that I realised I had left all of my toiletries in the hotel room. It was fair to say that we were not off to a good start.

Our luck only worsened when the lady sitting in front of me spilt her takeaway coffee. It trickled down through her seat and into the bag at my feet. I may be a fan of Vietnamese coffee, but that enthusiasm extends to when it’s in my stomach and not all over my possessions. Frustratingly, the woman seemed more concerned with the fact that her morning coffee had met a bitter end (pun intended) than the fact that she had effectively ruined the contents of my luggage.

The drive from Hanoi to Ha Long Bay was an ordeal in and of itself. I suffer from debilitating motion sickness and had been reassured that the drive would take a couple of hours max, only to arrive at our destination four nauseating hours later. I had never experienced a more stomach-churning journey in my life. The driver didn’t seem to understand the concept of the brake, and last night’s dinner threatened to make a reappearance. As I had also contracted an aggressive throat infection, I took codeine which mercifully knocked me out for the majority of the ride. My poor friend however was subjected to rude and unnecessary comments from the fellow tourists that left her feeling victimised and hurt. No one — not even the driver — felt the need to stick up for her or put the other tourists in their place.

When we arrived in Ha Long Bay, the driver climbed into the back of the shuttle and yelled at me in Vietnamese to wake up. Disorientated from the drugs, I stumbled with my queasy friend out of the shuttle and towards the port. I promptly received a phone call from the junk boat company where I was informed that the boat we had booked wasn’t available and that we had been switched to another. Whilst we weren’t bothered over the change of boat, we were annoyed that our original itinerary was no longer to go ahead. Activities we had looked forward to for months were cancelled and replaced with ones we would not have opted for on our own accord.

As it turned out, we didn’t have to worry about the change in itinerary. In the throes of pain, I downed a couple more codeine and passed out in our cabin for fourteen hours straight. My friend — still traumatised from the journey and interacting with the driver and fellow tourists — was relieved to have an excuse to hide in the cabin for the remainder of the voyage. We managed to sneak onto the isolated top deck before the boat docked the next day to enjoy the view and take some gorgeous photos, but for the most part, our experience was not one I recall fondly.

Reflecting on the experience, it’s easy to let the fact that we were mistreated by the driver and fellow tourists, fell very ill, had our plans cancelled without compensation and didn’t actually get to participate fully in the cruise monopolise my memory of Ha Long Bay. But the more I think about it, the more I have come to realise that I have two options: either I can remain sour and complain that the reality didn’t live up to my expectations, or I can accept that it happened and learn from the experience (ugh, I sound like my mother).

So… what good came out of the trip?

  • I experienced the unforgettable grandeur of Ha Long Bay (even if it was for half an hour when I was doped up on drugs)
  • The confidence that I can take ownership of a sticky situation when I have no one else (*cough parents cough*) to rely on
  • The knowledge that you should always pack the night before (again, my mother would be proud)
  • The ability to put a dreadful experience behind me and see it, not as a waste of money, but as a learning curve

I’ve made the decision not to name and shame the company we traveled with, partly because I also feel the other tourists were also responsible for our anxiety and partly because I can’t remember what they were called (🙈). The point that I want you to take away from this blog post is that shit can hit the fan. Ha Long Bay was supposed to be the pinnacle of our Southeast Asia trip, when in reality it was something that I could quite easily afford to forget. But what can I do?

In saying all of this, don’t let my experience taint your impression of Ha Long Bay. The destination was the redeeming feature of all of this, and I would quite happily return someday in the future (albeit privately and not through a company).

Be sure to check out my blog post — Postcards from Ha Long Bay — on the beauty of the UNESCO world heritage site!

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Why I Hate The Word Wanderlust

If we are going to compile a list of travel words that need to go away, then we can start with wanderlust.

Wanderlust is defined as “a strong desire to travel”. The urban dictionary has felt the need to further define wanderlust as “a very popular hashtag used on Instagram by girls who love to show off in all of their journeys”. No comment.

Before I start receiving hate letters from Pinterest users, allow me to clarify that I have nothing against people who like to travel. In fact, if I were, I would be something of an enormous hypocrite. I have read many intriguing articles written by bloggers who feel that wanderlust preaches inauthentic experience. However, my problem lies in the terminology.

We can collapse wanderlust into two words: wander and lust. While I have no qualms with the former, I do hold serious reservations about the latter. Lust – a passionate desire for something – has the implicit connotation that this object one longs for is not within reach. When men describe themselves as lusting after a woman (or vice versa – I’m nothing if not a feminist), they are generally referring to someone they cannot attain. Lust is unrequited, if you will.

If we apply this unrequitedness to wanderlust, we observe well-intending hash-tagging individuals as people whom consume all their time with pining after that escape but rarely take the measures necessary to turn dreams into reality. Am I generalising? Unashamedly so. But one consultation of Tumblr demonstrates my point.

For most people, travel doesn’t have to be something that exists purely in theory. Saving to finance a trip can be soul-crushing and demands sacrifice, but it’s not impossible. I saved up enough money to travel to Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia in late 2016 after ten months of working five part-time jobs on top of full-time university. It was social suicide – and admittedly not the best for my mental health – but it got me those plane tickets.

Wikipedia (everyone’s favourite reliable online source) discusses how wanderlust might “… reflect an intense urge for self-development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures, ways of life and behaviours”.

I like that, I really do. Furthermore, I completely understand where people using the term for this purpose are coming from. But to put it bluntly, I feel like people are abusing the term and using it to make excuses. If you want to travel, formulate a plan and invest your energy into making it come to fruition.

In the words of the Travel Playbook: Start Traveling. Stop Lusting.

Photos sourced from Unsplash.

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The Bucket List: Banksy’s Walled Off Hotel (Or Why Tourism is Political)

This is the second edition in the Bucket List series, with the first showcasing the Balinese architecture of Villa Ariana Grande. However, what makes this post so special is that what I am about to discuss is worth more than a pretty Instagram picture.

It is only recently that I have begun to take an active interest in politics, and it was one of the best decisions I have ever made. Not only is it crucial that someone has a reasonable understanding of the political and cultural dynamics when traveling to a different country (in the interests of safety, if nothing else), but following current events and the like provides that extra dimension of appreciation for the context in which one experiences a new place.

The centrepiece of this post is Banksy’s Walled Off Hotel. Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you will know that Banksy is a controversial and political graffiti artist who created the likes of Girl with the Red Balloon and Pulp Fiction. It was only in March 2017 – one month ago at the time of writing – that he opened the hotel.

The Walled Off Hotel is quite literally a work of art. In fact, it’s more of a demonstration than anything. The Walled Off hotel – hence it’s name – is located in Bethlehem opposite the Separation Wall (a wall constructed by Israel to segregate the country from Palestinian territory) and is self-promoted as having “the worst view in the world”.

The Walled Off Hotel has the unique potential to send a political message through it’s geography. According to the Conversation, “… placing an operating hotel on a site where guests can feel the oppression of the wall and experience the surveillance of an Israeli watchtower works to embed visitors in the occupation.” Guests will be subjected to physical confinement, checkpoints and security checks in the hopes of inciting feelings of injustice for those suffering from conflict such as that between Israel and Palestine. Banksy invites guests to subjugate themselves to the tensions of occupation, and his intentions for his latest masterpiece to construct a marriage between tourism and politics are sure to hit the mark.

Banksy’s latest instalment has attracted substantial media attention. Al Jazeera reported that critics accused him of “… making a profit off Palestinian suffering, normalising the occupation (and) beautifying the wall”. However, others applaud Banksy on his critique of the way Western tourists divorce travel from a country’s civil affairs and oppression. As for your opinion…? Well, you’ll just have to decide that for yourself.

If you are thinking about booking a reservation, you may want to act fast; it is likely that the hotel will only be funded for the remaining of 2017. Learn everything you need to know here.

The ‘Deats

Name: The Walled Off Hotel

Creator: Banksy

Location: 182 Caritas Street, Bethlehem, Palestine

Website: www.banksy.co.uk

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Everything You Need To Know About Tailoring in Hoi An

Tailoring in Southeast Asia is vast and world-renowned, although perhaps nowhere as much as Hoi An. Hoi An – a small town in central Vietnam – is known for many beautiful things, among which include a thriving tailor industry. Over 700 tailors reside here, with the trade often existing generations upon generations back within a single family.

If you’ve read any of my other blog posts from Southeast Asia, you’ll know that I am unapologetically suspicious of anything that doesn’t quite stack up. So when I discovered how little it cost to get six items of clothing made at various tailors across town, I was skeptical about the quality of the garments I would be receiving. Yet after doing some research, I was quickly reassured that I would not be sacrificing quality for price. The low prices are attributed to the low cost of living (and consequently wages) in Southeast Asia.

In saying that, you should always be vigilant of tailors that are prepared to rip you off. Despite the cost of tailoring in Southeast Asia being low, there are still those that will try and sell you inferior fabric or overcharge for substandard service. Although I didn’t encounter any tailors that I was unsatisfied with, I have heard from a handful of travellers that there is an outrageous number of tailors who actually do not produce garments in their own shops.

If you are being accompanied by a tour guide, be wary that they may take you to certain tailors regardless of their quality of service simply because they receive a commission. This happened to me thanks to one shady tour guide, but luckily the tailor we ended up at was absolutely superb 👌

So how can you tell which tailor to invest in? Unfortunately, simply consulting TripAdvisor won’t always suffice. Tailors often pay companies to remove negative reviews and replace them with fake positive ones for the sake of improving business. Instead, I recommend engaging in some good old fashioned research. If you have the luxury of time, go exploring and investigate the different tailors on offer in Hoi An. If you have a particular design in mind, keep an eye out for tailors with fabrics to cater to your needs. Not all tailors have an abundance of materials on hand, so if you are looking for something special such as leather or chiffon, it pays to do your homework in advance. Furthermore, inquire about the experience of the tailors. Generally speaking, there is a reliable correlation between years in the industry and service satisfaction.

The Tailoring Process

  1. You walk into the tailor shop (without a reservation)
  2. You decide on the design(s) you would like madeA question I often receive is whether you need a preconceived idea in mind of what you would like made. There is no right or wrong answer to this; you can either bring a picture of a garment you would like made or you can collaborate with the tailor to create a design using their ideas. I myself have experimented with each option and have been ecstatic with the results of both (if not more so with the collaborated design).
  3. Your measurements are recorded with photographs taken if need be
  4. You will be required to make a deposit on your orderIn my experience, this is typically 50% of the total price. In return, you will receive an itemised receipt as proof of order.
  5. You will return for your first fitting where you will try on unfinished garments
  6. The tailor will make chalk marks and/or insert pins where changes need to be made to ensure the clothing is the right sizeThis step may be repeated a number of times depending on how long it takes to get the perfect fit. This generally depends on the difficulty of the design and the fabric used.
  7. Once the garment(s) are all finished, you will return for the final fittingReaching this final part of the process can take from between a few hours to a few days. When you are satisfied, you will pay what the deposit did not cover and the tailor will package your purchase in plastic sleeves.

Bonus Tips and Tricks

☞ Capitalise on the fact that they are tailors!

So you want an A-line skirt. Fantastic! But why are you traveling halfway across the world to buy one? The whole idea of tailoring is to order something original, so make the most of the opportunity.

☞ Be flexible!

As I mentioned above, not all tailors have the materials you may specifically request. To ensure you will be happy with the final product, endeavour to entertain all ideas and avoid a fixed mindset.

☞ “You scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours”

Cheesy proverb aside, if you are utilising the service of a tailor, it is only fair that you reciprocate. A little positive feedback on Tripadvisor goes a long way for small businesses (if you are satisfied with the experience, of course). This is especially the case as tourists rely on such means to finalise their itinerary. Tailors will also give you their business cards so that you don’t forget their name, and won’t be subtle in their hints for you to leave a good word or two on their social networks.

I visited a variety of different tailors in Hoi An, but perhaps my favourite was Two Ladies. There, I had the most stunning forest-green coat with a satin lining made that makes me feel somewhat like a Tolkien elf. I brought a similar style back home in New Zealand about a year previously on sale, where the original retail price was NZD$900 (approximately USD$630). In Hoi An, I paid around NZD$50 for the new coat (approximately USD$35) and — although I’m no couture expert — I am convinced that the quality of the latter is far superior.

The ‘Deats

Name: Two Ladies

Location: 71 Tran Hung Dao, Hoi An, Vietnam

Contact: +84 510 3928 123

TripAdvisor: Two Ladies Tailor Shop

Facebook: Two Ladies Tailor

Have you ever visited Hoi An for some unique retail therapy? What tailor(s) would you recommend to future travellers?

All photos sourced from unsplash.com

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Why Disneyland Is The Happiest Place On Earth… For Adults

To quote Buzzfeed, “… whenever you tell a person you’ve never been to Disneyland, they go through at least seven different stages of stunning disbelief before telling you that you have to — no, listen: YOU HAVE TO. Get in a car and drive to Disneyland, because every second you waste not being at Disneyland is apparently crushing your soul into tiny bits of magic-less oblivion.”

As someone who has visited the happiest place on earth both as an eight year old and as an eighteen year old, I feel that I am somewhat knowledgeable in terms of experiencing the amusement park from two very different walks of life. As an eight year old, my Disneyland experience consisted of stuffing my face with candy floss, queuing for an hour for Space Mountain, wanting to vomit said candy floss as I was hurtling through the nauseating galaxy of said Space Mountain – and repeat. It was only as an eighteen year old that I realised Disneyland is more than just a fantastical sugar rush for kids.

The Architecture

I’m a bit of a sucker for design, and — much to the delight of my friends — insist on stopping every time we pass a building so that I can take a picture. As cheesy as it sounds, ‘reading’ the Disneyland surroundings is an adventure in itself; you can learn as much from the environment as you can from the experience. One of my favourite aspects of the Disneyland architecture is that of the Main Street; here, you’ll find homage to Second Empire Victorian with a nod to Hollywood art deco.

(If this bores you, you may find yourself rethinking your appreciation for architecture when you’re waiting in line with nothing to entertain yourself except for the buildings around you.)

The Escapism

Escapism is defined as “an inclination to retreat from unpleasant realities through diversion or fantasy”. As human beings, we all experiencing adversity and the pressing weight of society at various points in our lives. In order to secure a satisfactory level of well-being, we all need a chance to release and ‘let down our hair’, so to speak. If Disneyland can’t do that for you, then I don’t know what can.

Stepping through the front gates is the phenomenological equivalent of stepping through a portal and into a magical and exquisite world. Everything is insurmountably better; Disneyland even seems to defy the laws of physics. Even as a temporary relief, the amusement park is an important source of happiness for those who seek it. If you approach the experience as an opportunity to escape reality, then you can be sure you’ll be getting bang for your buck.

The Food

Downtown Disney is the cuisine hub of Disneyland. The best time to visit it is at night when you can enjoy a refreshing beer beneath the beautiful lights of the boulevards. However, that is not to say that Disneyland itself has nothing mouth-watering on offer. In fact, I have compiled a short list that you should make your mission to try the next time you hear your stomach grumbling.

BBQ Tofu from River Belle Terrace (spot the vegetarian)

Hand-Dipped Ice Cream Bars at Clarabelle’s Hand Scooped Ice Cream

Peanut Butter Sandwich from Pooh Corner

Churros from… anywhere, really!

The Rides

Come on, you can’t discuss an amusement park and miss out the rides. Plus, I’m a firm believer that you are never too old for a rollercoaster, and that anyone who claims otherwise needs a good old dose of faith, trust and pixie dust to cheer them up. Although you’ll find more adrenalised rides at California Adventure right next door, one that ranks right up there for me is Space Mountain. Think a fast-paced rollercoaster. In the dark. Surrounded by a nebula of exploding stars. It’s a Trekkie’s wet dream.

If you are more disposed towards taking it slow, I recommend you check out the highly acclaimed Pirates of the Caribbean, an indoor “swashbuckling voyage” where your boat will drift past intricately crafted gun and sword fights. On that note, don’t forget to make a reservation at the Blue Bayou. This restaurant is located within the Pirates of the Caribbean complex and specialises in Cajun and Creole cuisine.

What I’m trying to say is that if you are planning a trip to Los Angeles, don’t completely write off Disneyland as catering solely to children. If you approach it from with right attitude, there is as much joy to be experienced as an adult as when you were a kid. From the architecture to the escapism and from the food to the rides, the happiest place on earth no longer has an expiration date.

Are you an adult who has dared to put on the mouse ears and venture into Walt Disney’s fantasia? What was your experience like?

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This Is Why I Travel

During a philosophy class last semester, I stumbled across a particular term: a posteriori. It means to know something through experience. And as it happens, a posteriori is how I would describe my knowledge of the number one reason I travel.

If you had asked me four months ago why I traveled, the answer to that question would have been simple; I travel to meet new people, to explore new places, to try new food and to learn new things. Whilst that answer isn’t necessarily wrong, there is another reason that now tops that list. I cannot think of one word to describe it; all I know is that I only discovered it through experience.
There we were – my friend and I – strolling through central Hanoi during a walking tour. We had just exited the Ho Chi Minh Museum when suddenly a couple of Vietnamese children who couldn’t have been more than five years old ran smack bang into us. One wrapped his arms around my legs and clung to me like a limpet. I had to shoot my arms out to capture my balance.

“I’m so sorry!” a woman apologised, descending upon us and peeling the child from my legs. My friend and I laughed and reassured her that it was no worries. We made to leave when the woman caught my arm and asked us a question. I didn’t quite catch her properly, but gathered that she was wondering if we would be interested in taking a quick English class with the children. My friend and I exchanged nervous glances; we were predisposed to be wary of scams or getting roped into something dodgy that would result in some form of payment – let’s be realistic, this was Southeast Asia – but in the end our manners got the better of us and we let her drag us across the bridge and to a square where the rest of the group were.

It turned out that she was the teacher of a class of about thirty students from an international language school. The children were all around the age of five and were wearing matching uniforms. I’ll never forget the way their faces lit up when my friend and I walked over. There was another teacher, and she and the first woman divided the children into two different groups and then allocated my friend and I to a class each.

I was given a set of A4 laminated cards, each with different pictures on them, and instructed to ask questions related to the content. The children would then answer in English to practice their language skills. For example, I might hold up a card with an illustration of kids playing outside in a playground, and ask how many ducks were swimming in the pond, or what colour the monkey bars were. The children would collectively shout out the correct answers in perfect English.

The feeling I got from being a part of this short yet valuable activity really made an impact on me. I got a rush of adrenaline every time the children got the answer right and cheered. The teacher asked if they could take a picture with me, and they all scrambled to stand next to me. I couldn’t wipe the grin off my face as fifteen pairs of tiny hands reached out to hold mine as we posed for the camera.

In that moment, I knew. I knew that this was why I traveled. I don’t just travel for the people, the places or the food. I travel for those small, unexpected moments where you’re pinching yourself to make sure you’re awake. I travel for those rewarding experiences that inspire you to flip your life upside down. I travel for the exuberance and utter joy that was on those children’s faces as I took my English class that day in the middle of the bustling Hanoi square. I knew very well that for those children, the memory of the girl with the red hair who asked them about ducks and monkey bars would fade in time, but what mattered was the impression I made in those few short minutes.

I travel for the times where – after rendering myself broke to afford a trip – I feel like the richest person on the planet.

All photos of Vietnam sourced from unsplash.com

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Everything You Need to Know About Getting a Tattoo in Thailand

If you had asked ten year old me if I were likely to ever get a tattoo, I would have given a squeaky, pre-pubescent laugh. Me? The goody-two-shoes kid who always checks twice before she crosses the road? Not fudging likely. But as you will know, young adulthood always turns up late to the party with a plus one of experimentation, and why not explore your new identity with getting a tattoo that you will be stuck with for the rest of your life? That’s the exact opposite of a recipe for disaster, if you ask me.

Nine years later and — much to my parent’s disgrace — I have initiated a tradition of acquiring a tattoo in every new place I travel to. I have homage to New Zealand, the United States and Rarotonga permanently etched into my skin, and plans for many more. I have so many ideas and opinions about tattoos that I would love to share, but they alone warrant their own post. For now, I am going to share my experience of adding to the collection with a Thailand tat.

So there we were; me — the veteran with my measly three tattoos — and my ink virgin friend Poppy, roaming the sleazy and drunken streets of Pattaya for a semi-reputable tattoo parlour. Just that sentence in and of itself is a parent’s worst nightmare. We had investigated maybe seven or eight studios before settling on one that looked to offer a sanitised and satisfactory experience.

And so I present to you: Eve Tattoo Studios.

I’m not going to lie; I was drawn to my tattooist Jim because of his devilish good looks. Very professional of me, I know. The other factor that ticked the box for me was that he looked to be of European descent. This stemmed purely from the fact that I was searching for someone who would speak English well, and that I would be able to communicate with throughout the process. In light of the fact that we were tattoo-hunting in Southeast Asia, this was quite the priority in my books. I consider the Thai artists to be very talented and innovative, however when you are getting work permanently inked into your skin, you need to be on the same level of understanding. A language barrier is the first step to painful and expensive regret.

Having not really committed to any particular design yet, I opted for a spontaneous rendition of my favourite piece of artwork: The Great Wave off Kanagawa, a woodblock print by artist Katsushika Hokusai. And yes, incase you feel the pressing urge to remind me, I am very much aware that I got a Japanese-style tattoo to honour Thailand. Don’t question my motives. Meanwhile, Poppy stuck to her guns and settled on an intricate dragon fly that she’d had her eye on ever since I had thrown the idea of her also getting a tattoo into the mix.

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The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai

If you have never gotten a tattoo before, then I’m sure you probably have a lot of questions. I was exactly the same. Whether it hurts or not tends to be the most pressing, and I’m not going to lie; it hurts like a bitch. In saying that though, I am a complete and utter wuss. I cry when I have to get a blood test, and I have avoided piercing my ears for fear of inexplicable agony (*cue derisive laughter*). Yet somehow, I manage to drag myself into that chair time and time again.

The best way I can describe the sensation of the needle upon your skin is by likening it to that of a prolonged cat scratch. What’s more, the beauty of tattoos — as opposed to piercings, as I have been told — is that as soon as the artist removes the gun, the pain vanishes (at least, in my experience that has been the case). Sure, you get some itching and irritation during the healing process, but you will not have to endure months and months of tenderness or rawness in the aftermath. The pain itself is a very concise and fleeting sensation.

Things to be Mindful of when Tattoo-Hunting in Thailand

Avoid Language Barriers

If you cannot clearly communicate what you would like done, then maybe it is time to consider another studio. There are so many important things to discuss — whether that be finalising a design, settling on a price, answering any burning questions or detailing the healing process — that crossing your fingers and hoping ambiguous hand gestures will do the trick just isn’t good enough. If you are prepared to walk away with a tattoo you are not happy to have on your body forever — with no idea how to look after it — then by all means, ignore this tip. But if you want the process to be smooth sailing and stress-free, then this should be at the top of your checklist.

Do Not Use a ‘Cheap Bargain’ as the Dictator of Where You Get Your Tattoo Done

As is the general rule of thumb with most goods and services, a higher price is indicative of higher quality. Tattoos are no exception. In a place such as Southeast Asia where bartering is the norm, quality can be harder to gauge as artists are always trying to beat the previous price. We ended up going with Eve Tattoo Studios, who provided the most expensive quote.

Cleanliness

There’s a reason for all the jokes around HIV and AIDS when telling friends you’re getting a tattoo in Thailand. Okay, maybe that is reserved for the worst case scenario, but there are still plenty of consequences to reap from short-cutting the process. You need to make sure the studio is sanitised and clean. A professional artist may tell you that they are using a new needle straight out of the packet, and some — such as Jim — will even show you as they open it for peace of mind. This tip is more common sense than anything, but as someone who understands the feeling of getting caught up in the excitement and adrenaline of a new tattoo, it is not difficult for the basics to get brushed to the back of your mind.

Do Your Research!

Can we please take a moment to appreciate the magic of Tripadvisor? You wouldn’t send your child to a new school without looking into the quality of both the institution and the employees. Okay, strange analogy, but you get the gist. Another thing I strongly recommend doing before committing to a studio, is asking to view work done by the tattooist that is similar to what you are looking at getting done. I have found that this is especially relevant to conventionally feminine designs, as studios are more likely to advertise their big, colourful pieces that accumulate hours and hours of work, and tens of thousands of dollars. It is one thing for an artist to be adept at these styles, but if you are more interested in minimalist pieces, it definitely pays to ask to see their personal experience with these.

Find the Balance Between Assertion and Flexibility

I learnt the hard way that it is unfeasible to waltz into a tattoo parlour lacking the mindset to adapt your design according to the artist’s recommendations. You need to remember that your artist has your interests at heart, and is just trying to negotiate a compromise on a design and placement that will both suit your tastes and look good at the same time. In saying that, if they suggest a final design that you do not like, you need to make it clear that you are not happy with it. As a naturally passive person, it took a number of goes for me to muster the confidence to tell my tattooist that I didn’t like what they were suggesting, but that I was willing to explore other options.

Choose Your Timing Wisely

This is especially applicable to traveling. The healing process of a tattoo is not long and complicated, but there are a handful of things you need to abide by for your designated time period. One of these is that you must avoid swimming and sun exposure. As you can imagine, this can prove a hassle if you are traveling to a tropical destination where lounging on a sun-drenched beach is one of the selling-points (ahem Thailand). If this is the case, you might want to book your tattoo in for the end of your trip. Otherwise, it’s hello layers.

Cultural Appropriation

If you have culturally-orientated ink lined up in your sights, you may want to double check what is appropriate and what is not. In Thailand, it is considered disrespectful to have the Buddha tattooed onto you. Whilst this may not appear to be such a pressing issue once you are on the flight home, I firmly believe that respect and courtesy to the customs and values of your host country are of the upmost importance.

So there you have it; my tips and tricks for getting a tattoo in Thailand. And if you ever feel like making a spontaneous and permanent decision in the southern town of Pattaya, I highly recommend you pay Jim and the rest of the team at Eve Tattoo Studios a call.

The ‘Deats

Name: Eve Tattoo Studios

Location: Pattaya, Thailand

Number: +66 87 130 1808

Processed with VSCO with hb2 preset
Enjoying my fresh ink at Ha Long Bay

Have your own crazy tattoo experiences or advice to share? Comment below! I would love to hear all of your stories!

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