Fluctuat Ner Mergitur: A Paris Photo Diary

Paris is… well, Paris. I spent a week exploring the city with a camera in one hand and a map in the other, slowly but surely falling in love with the aristocratic metropolis. It is quite unlike anywhere else, and after seven days there in July, I feel as though I have hardly brushed the surface of the city of love.

“Paris was a universe whole and entire unto herself, hollowed and fashioned by history… as vast and indestructible as nature itself”

Anne Rice

Paris wasn’t always called Paris. In the 3rd century B.C., when it was a Roman city, Paris was known as Lutetia.

The Eiffel Tower

During World War II, the French Resistance cut the elevator cables to the Eiffel Tower to keep Hitler from visiting it during his time in France after Paris fell. Apparently the prospect of climbing 1500+ stairs did not appeal to him.

The name Paris isn’t quite as original as you may think; there are actually 38 cities called Paris across the globe.

The famous blue door of Montmartre where Vincent van Gogh lived

Paris earned the nickname, ‘the City of Lights’, but contrary to popular opinion, this has nothing to do with illumination. Rather, ‘lights’ alludes to the intellectuals, specifically the many writers and academics drawn to the city.

Parisian flower markets

Every year in Paris, around a dozen Japanese tourists must return to Japan after being diagnosed with ‘Paris Syndrome‘ i.e. being completely unprepared for the reality of Paris not being as great as expected. These tourists are usually women in their 30s who are on their first overseas trip.

Paris has a network of ghost metro stations that no one uses because lines were either rerouted or simply fell out of use.

A painted house on Rue Crémieux

After a decision made by the Paris municipal government, Tom Cruise may never become an honorary citizen of the city owing to his views on scientology.

Statues adorning the exterior of Notre Dame

The last public execution held in Paris was in 1939.

The Artist’s Square in Montmartre

There are more dogs in Paris than there are people.

The Eiffel Tower

There is only one stop sign in Paris.

The beautiful Rue Crémieux

There is a law that buildings shall not exceed 6 storeys in Paris. This is so that all can have access to sunshine.

The Rose Window of Notre Dame

The main bell in the Notre Dame Cathedral has a name: Emmanuel.

Arc de Triomphe

There is a Statue of Liberty in Paris that faces the Statue of Liberty in New York City, representing the bond between the two cities.

Fluctuat Ner Mergitur is the motto of Paris, translating from Latin to, “Tossed But Not Sunk”, referring to a ship. I think that’s kind of beautiful.

All the trees in Paris are measured and referenced. Bonus fact: there are 470,000 of them 🌳

A filming location for Amélie in Montmartre

On average, 10 films or commercials shoot in Paris every day.

The Louvre

Before the Nazi armies invaded Paris during World War II, the art collection at the Louvre was secretly distributed amongst wealthy French citizens to protect it.

Mais attendez! Don’t forget to read Revue de CitiX60 Guides: Paris, for a selection of things to do in the City of Love that extend beyond the generic tourist traps. Au revoir!

Let’s Get Social!

Facebook ● Twitter ● Youtube ● Bloglovin’

And don’t forget to subscribe to our monthly email newsletter!

Continue Reading

Why Disneyland Is The Happiest Place On Earth… For Adults

To quote Buzzfeed, “… whenever you tell a person you’ve never been to Disneyland, they go through at least seven different stages of stunning disbelief before telling you that you have to — no, listen: YOU HAVE TO. Get in a car and drive to Disneyland, because every second you waste not being at Disneyland is apparently crushing your soul into tiny bits of magic-less oblivion.”

As someone who has visited the happiest place on earth both as an eight year old and as an eighteen year old, I feel that I am somewhat knowledgeable in terms of experiencing the amusement park from two very different walks of life. As an eight year old, my Disneyland experience consisted of stuffing my face with candy floss, queuing for an hour for Space Mountain, wanting to vomit said candy floss as I was hurtling through the nauseating galaxy of said Space Mountain – and repeat. It was only as an eighteen year old that I realised Disneyland is more than just a fantastical sugar rush for kids.

The Architecture

I’m a bit of a sucker for design, and — much to the delight of my friends — insist on stopping every time we pass a building so that I can take a picture. As cheesy as it sounds, ‘reading’ the Disneyland surroundings is an adventure in itself; you can learn as much from the environment as you can from the experience. One of my favourite aspects of the Disneyland architecture is that of the Main Street; here, you’ll find homage to Second Empire Victorian with a nod to Hollywood art deco.

(If this bores you, you may find yourself rethinking your appreciation for architecture when you’re waiting in line with nothing to entertain yourself except for the buildings around you.)

The Escapism

Escapism is defined as “an inclination to retreat from unpleasant realities through diversion or fantasy”. As human beings, we all experiencing adversity and the pressing weight of society at various points in our lives. In order to secure a satisfactory level of well-being, we all need a chance to release and ‘let down our hair’, so to speak. If Disneyland can’t do that for you, then I don’t know what can.

Stepping through the front gates is the phenomenological equivalent of stepping through a portal and into a magical and exquisite world. Everything is insurmountably better; Disneyland even seems to defy the laws of physics. Even as a temporary relief, the amusement park is an important source of happiness for those who seek it. If you approach the experience as an opportunity to escape reality, then you can be sure you’ll be getting bang for your buck.

The Food

Downtown Disney is the cuisine hub of Disneyland. The best time to visit it is at night when you can enjoy a refreshing beer beneath the beautiful lights of the boulevards. However, that is not to say that Disneyland itself has nothing mouth-watering on offer. In fact, I have compiled a short list that you should make your mission to try the next time you hear your stomach grumbling.

BBQ Tofu from River Belle Terrace (spot the vegetarian)

Hand-Dipped Ice Cream Bars at Clarabelle’s Hand Scooped Ice Cream

Peanut Butter Sandwich from Pooh Corner

Churros from… anywhere, really!

The Rides

Come on, you can’t discuss an amusement park and miss out the rides. Plus, I’m a firm believer that you are never too old for a rollercoaster, and that anyone who claims otherwise needs a good old dose of faith, trust and pixie dust to cheer them up. Although you’ll find more adrenalised rides at California Adventure right next door, one that ranks right up there for me is Space Mountain. Think a fast-paced rollercoaster. In the dark. Surrounded by a nebula of exploding stars. It’s a Trekkie’s wet dream.

If you are more disposed towards taking it slow, I recommend you check out the highly acclaimed Pirates of the Caribbean, an indoor “swashbuckling voyage” where your boat will drift past intricately crafted gun and sword fights. On that note, don’t forget to make a reservation at the Blue Bayou. This restaurant is located within the Pirates of the Caribbean complex and specialises in Cajun and Creole cuisine.

What I’m trying to say is that if you are planning a trip to Los Angeles, don’t completely write off Disneyland as catering solely to children. If you approach it from with right attitude, there is as much joy to be experienced as an adult as when you were a kid. From the architecture to the escapism and from the food to the rides, the happiest place on earth no longer has an expiration date.

Are you an adult who has dared to put on the mouse ears and venture into Walt Disney’s fantasia? What was your experience like?

Let’s Get Social!

Facebook ● Instagram ● Youtube ● Bloglovin’

And don’t forget to subscribe to our weekly email newsletter!

Continue Reading